What are the reasons behind sexual abuse survivors speaking out years later?

Survivors of sexual abuse who speak out against their abusers years after the incident are often viewed with suspicion.

702/Cape Talk's Redi Tlhabi spoke to two sexual abuse survivors about their decision to speak out against their abusers.

Redi also invited founding director of Woman and Men Against Child Abuse, Miranda Friedmann, and to talk about their work related to the issue.

Listen to the conversation below:

Their whole life after the abuse becomes about survial. It has a lot of fear, a lot of anxiety and multiple trust issues in all aspects of your life.

Miranda Friedman, WMACA founding director

We must remember that with the uncertainty and betrayal, the child will ask themselves what will happen if they tell.

Miranda Friedman, WMACA founding director

He told me that it was normal, that fathers and daughters did that. Being a child and with him being the person who was supposed to protect me, I didn't know better.

Chantelle Akers, allegedly raped by her father

Chantelle was raped by her father 28 years ago over a period of 6 years, she was 11-years old at the time when it began.

He made it very clear that if we told my mom and she would divorce him and leave us with him and it would be worse. So he instilled a lot of fear.

Chantelle Akers, allegedly raped by her father

At seven or eights years-old, I would not have had the vocabulary to explain what I thought was a guy I held in high esteem was doing to me.

Paul Diamond, allegedly molested by Sidney Frankel

You don't question the uncle, the Rabbi, the sports coach in this instances. And you certainly do not question the cousin who is a billionaire, who you look up to and play tennis with every weekend.

Paul Diamond, allegedly molested by Sidney Frankel

This article first appeared on 702 : What are the reasons behind sexual abuse survivors speaking out years later?


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