What are the delays in releasing 'Jobs for Cash' report?

Delays in releasing the 'Jobs for Cash' report by Minister of Education, Angie Motshekga, has invited criticism about the influence of teacher union, SADTU, in the debacle.

The report is an investigation looking into allegations of teacher unions using their power to unduly influence placement of teachers.

702/Cape Talk's Redi Tlhabi spoke to representatives from the National Department of Education and Equal Education regarding the issue.

Listen to the interview below:

Our irritation is that the delays have not been explained substantially. The argument that is being made is that we give those that are implicated an opportunity to respond.

Tshepo Motsepe, Equal Education General Secretary

Those annexures do not change the report as it stands, so why hold onto the report? Release the report and those annexures can come up because these are just responses.

Tshepo Motsepe, Equal Education General Secretary

Implicated organisations and individuals were invited, interviewed and evidence was gathered. But they have not given the opportunity to see the final report.

Tshepo Motsepe, Equal Education General Secretary

The department claims that it's important to give implicated persons and organisations an opportunity to respond to the report before it goes public.

We are absolutely certain that the report will be out on the 6th of May without further delays.

Elijah Mhlanga, Department of Basic Education spokesperson

It's about how it has come about for people to manipulate the system in such a way to place people in exchange for cash. We have to look at systemic issues we're dealing with and that report looks at that.

Elijah Mhlanga, Department of Basic Education spokesperson

There are horror stories. We've heard that people would go to schools with guns and wait outside interview venues just to intimidate the panel.

Elijah Mhlanga, Department of Basic Education spokesperson

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