New vaccine trial signals hope for end to HIV

New scientific research developments signals hope in introducing an HIV vaccine to alleviate contracting the virus.

702/Cape Talk's Africa Melane (standing-in for Redi Tlhabi) spoke to Dr Danielle Crida from Emavundleni Research Centre regarding the breakthrough.

Listen to the interview below:

The interim results shows that the vaccine we are testing at the moment has a very good immune response.

Dr Danielle Crida, Emavundleni Research Centre

It is expected to be taken into phase 3 testing later this year.

This is a preventative HIV vaccine that would be given to uninfected people to prevent contracting HIV.

Dr Danielle Crida, Emavundleni Research Centre

The first vaccine regimen is based on a canary pox virus... and that virus has been in-activated. Genes from HIV are injected into that canary pox virus and that forms the first vaccine.

Dr Danielle Crida, Emavundleni Research Centre

There is also a protein vaccine containing some parts of the HIV protein as well as other immune boosters, which together boost the immune system.

Participants in the trial will receive five vaccines over the course of a year, and it is hoped this will provide long lasting immunity.

It will provide long-lasting immunity, so you wouldn't have to keep going back like a flu vaccine.

Dr Danielle Crida, Emavundleni Research Vaccine

The Emavundleni Research Centre is a branch of the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre.

Results of the trials are expected to be made available in 2020.

It would be a bit optimistic to think it would be 100% effective. If it were to be rolled out, it would be in conjuction with safe sex messaging.

Dr Danielle Crida, Emavundleni Research Centre

This article first appeared on 702 : New vaccine trial signals hope for end to HIV


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