Today's Big Stories

Heavy police presence and Soweto spaza stresses on high

Soweto stresses: there is now a massive police presence in various parts of Soweto, following what looks like more xenophobic violence overnight. Several shops owned by foreign nationals were looted, while others were set alight following the death of a 14-year-old boy, who was allegedly shot dead by a shop owner after being accused of stealing. EWN Senior Correspondent, Gia Nicolaides:

We really have been going from one shop to the next, where each shop owner has expressed that there have been threats made against them. Police have been firing rubber bullets (to control the situation) since 10 this morning and these locations are all five minutes apart. The looters are said to be teenagers suspected of taking nyaope and every time we keep stopping at a shop anywhere, it's either been looted or there's a police presence there and authorities have taken to removing the shops' stock and placing it in a place of safety at a police station. Some observers say this isn't a xenophobic looting of shops, but that all shops in Soweto are being looted as an act of revenge from these teenagers who feel they were wronged over the killing of the 14-year-old boy.

Chief Executive Officer at the SA Human Rights Commission, Kayum Ahmed:

We've been dealing with the question of xenophobic attacks for a number of years. We are deeply concerned with the violence we are seeing being committed by these teenagers, whether it's connected to xenophobia or not. Foreign nationals are very important to South Africa as they contribute to our GDP and we need to make sure they are protected under all circumstances. We are working with the police on the ground - although there isn't intelligence on location to inform the situation - because we don't want to see a repeat of the 2008 attacks.

Vavi vs Mantashe on Guptagate: on the Wednesday edition of the Midday Report, a comment by Cosatu General Secretary Zwelinzima Vavi was that, in the absence of any other explanation, it was unavoidable that the finger of blame for the Waterkloof landing by the Gupta family pointed at President Jacob Zuma. Vavi was reacting to the decision to withdraw charges against two senior airforce officers who had been accused of allowing the Gupta family to land their wedding guests at the national keypoint. So far, Bruce Koloane (the former chief of state protocol in the Department of International Relations) is the only person who has been disciplined when he was demoted from his position, but later appointed Ambassador to the Netherlands by President Zuma. Just after the landing in 2013, ANC Secretary General Gwede Mantashe issued a statement saying those responsible for allowing this to happen must be held accountable. Mantashe's comments following the dropping of charges:

What is important about this case is that it has now been followed and every claim has been investigated and to me, that satisfies this situation. People must know that it's a learning point and if mistakes have been made, they must learn from it. (On Vavi's comments) they don't care about processes, they only care about having everything pointing back to Zuma - I am not part of that class. I am not sure if you would punish the Gupta family if they are given the right to land. If I had been given the right to land, I would land there too!

Access at educational institutions: more reports have emerged today about Lekae Combrink-Nawa who has been barred from studying at the Tshwane university of Technology (TUT) because he has no legs and is using a wheelchair. The university says it doesn’t have the facilities to allow him to study there. TUT spokeswoman Willa de Ruyter:

It was a last option for us that he couldn't register. The building isn't wheelchair friendly and it would be costly to convert to it be this, eventhough there are a number of buildings that are wheelchair friendly. Government has made a commitment to provide prosthesis for the student so that can at least address mobility. We would like all students to have equal opportunities and we're really grateful to the Minister (of Higher Education, Blade Nzimande) for coming to assist him.

Lekae Combrink-Nawa's father, Dr Lance Nawa, who also works at TUT:

I would like to first welcome the intervention by the Minister to provide prosthesis. I had a meeting with Professor Van Staden, the Vice Principal who said he would have a look at the case and also for other students.The spokesperon has indicated that it's the department that has come with an intervention eight months later and there are departments that would - out of compassion - come with interventions. The major issue here is access to public facilities. We don't want to sound unappreciative - as if we can't look after our own situation at home - my son has prosthetics but they are outdated and they make him fall.

Aviation affairs: a comment on Wednesday by Transport Minister Dipou Peters is that many countries in Africa appeared to prefer to sign airline agreements with European and Middle-Eastern countries and were not signing agreements with other African countries. Editor of SA Flyer Magazine, Guy Leitch:

The simple truth of the matter is that African countries don't have the appetite to open up their skies. There have been bi-laterals with foreign carriers, but not with local ones. There's an enormous amount of protectionism in the pricing of tickets and that would be lowered when there would be more open skies and airline infrastructure needs to be looked into. SA is relatively open, which has allowed airlines such as Kulula to exist, but SAA has benefited the most from protectionism within the continent of Africa.

Malawi floods update: rescue and mop-up operations are now underway in the country after massive floods caused by heavy rain there. EWN Correspondent, Govan Whittles:

I'm out on a boat right now and the river has flown onto a football field, so a lot of land has been affected and houses have their roofs off - a lot of damage. Experts say it will take about 2 weeks for the water to go down and so planting won't be able to happen for some time right now.

Cuba-US talks: in Havana, the US and Cuba are now starting their highest level talks since probably the 1960’s, after the diplomatic thaw that was announced last month. US policy expert, Brookes Spector:

These talks are about the substance, not about red carpet arrivals at an airport. The highest ranking person dealing with Latin issues in the US government is a part of these talks. This is going to affect Cuba's economy a great deal, but the trade embargo as a fixed bid of US policy is dependant on Congress and cannot be overturned by the Presidential authority and overturning it would also allow Americans the ability to use credit cards in Cuba.

Lobola app: news this morning of a new app that claims to be able to tell men and women how many cows would have to be paid for lobola, should the man decide he should pay lobola when he marries his betrothed. It’s been developed by Robert Matsaneng:

I've got physical attributes that I use to calculate a BMI and then I get a body type from there. When I was doing some research with my family, I ended up basing a lot of the features on the app on that (the research). (On the reaction) I released the app in October and there's been mixed reaction and increased reaction in recent days. Some people have been negative and some have come with suggestions. Users have been men who try it out for curiosity and also women. (On what he'd expect for his daughter) I don't expect monetary value, but a gesture to appreciate the way I raised my daughter, whether it's monetary or not - it all depends on what is practical to the guy in question. Cows were practical at a certain point in time.


This article first appeared on 702 : Heavy police presence and Soweto spaza stresses on high


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI

CapeTalk welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

  • Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
  • Sexism
  • Homophobia
  • Religious intolerance
  • Cyber bullying
  • Hate speech
  • Derogatory language
  • Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the CapeTalk community a safe and welcoming space for all.

CapeTalk reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

CapeTalk is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

Read More
Veterans and ANC not on same page about terms of consultative conference

Veterans and ANC not on same page about terms of consultative conference

ANC vets want civil society groups present at the consultative conference, which they want held separately from another meeting.

Top SABC journos applauded for brave testimony

Top SABC journos applauded for brave testimony

EWN's Gaye Davis summarises the evidence of the SABC journalists who appeared before the ad hoc committee in Parliament.

If you're gona be a hero (and smash a car window), make sure you can prove harm

If you're gona be a hero (and smash a car window), make sure you can prove harm

A criminal lawyer explains what leg citizens can stand on if they witness a child or pet locked in a vehicle in risky conditions.

SABC 'in contempt of court' if Motsoeneng reports for duty, says DA

SABC 'in contempt of court' if Motsoeneng reports for duty, says DA

The DA's James Selfe says it is not clear whether SABC's Hlaudi Motsoeneng will be either fired or suspended pending an inquiry.

Tweeps throw shade as court shows Motsoeneng the door

Tweeps throw shade as court shows Motsoeneng the door

A judge has ruled that Hlaudi Motsoeneng should not hold any position at the SABC and Twitter has wasted no time reacting.

Why family traditions matter

Why family traditions matter

Whether it's breaking bread or celebrating through song and dance, family rituals and traditions can create a sense of belonging.

Popular articles
We're not just cyclists - CT man turns punch-up with driver into safety message

We're not just cyclists - CT man turns punch-up with driver into safety message

He was punched in the face by a motorist last week and tracked the driver down for a meet-up, instead of laying charges.

[WATCH] The spectacular moment AB de Villiers bent the laws of physics

[WATCH] The spectacular moment AB de Villiers bent the laws of physics

The world now knows never to underestimate the athletic form of SA cricketer AB de Villiers after this gravity-defying catch.

[LISTEN] Dailene, the lady behind the video from Thursday's heist in Boksburg

[LISTEN] Dailene, the lady behind the video from Thursday's heist in Boksburg

Another heist was carried out in Boksburg on Thursday morning and led to five people being arrested.

Health Minister proposes scrapping of medical aid co-payments

Health Minister proposes scrapping of medical aid co-payments

The eradication of medical aid co-payments is one of a number of changes to the medical aid scheme proposed by Aaron Motsoaledi.

SANDF soldier arrested for robbery on trial for attempted murder

SANDF soldier arrested for robbery on trial for attempted murder

Operations chief, General Barney Hlatshwayo's personal driver was arrested on Tuesday.

3 emergency numbers you should have on speed dial and how they work

3 emergency numbers you should have on speed dial and how they work

These are the emergency numbers you should have on your cellphone and this is what you must understand about how they work.