Today's Big Stories

4 reasons why a tax revolt won't work

South Africa has faced a great deal of economic and political uncertainty in recent months, with claims of state capture, corruption and cronyism marring government.

Some leaders and political analyst, including Judge Dennis Davis, have suggested that more corruption increases the likelihood of tax revolt in the country.

However, tax specialist Ettiene Retief says that a tax revolt wouldn't work. Here's why:

1. It's illegal.

2. The majority of citizens who pay tax do so indirectly through their employer, and have little logistical control over the process.

3. Only a small percentage of citizens pay taxes on other income, and Sars can collect money from those attempting to withhold tax.

4. The economy (and citizens) would be negatively affected, and public services such as education and health care would suffer.

Despite the practical constraints, Retief says willingness and tax morality will most likely deteriorate among South Africans.

Listen to the full conversation from CapeTalk's Breakfast with Kieno Kammies:

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