Things to to in Cape Town: Oranjezicht City Farm

Leewenhof, official residence of the Western Cape Premier

The site is next to the corner of Sidmouth Avenue and Upper Orange Street. It is part of a piece of land that has been used for farming since the 1700's although for many years has not been well maintained. A group of concerned citizens took action in 2011, first clearing the site and then in 2013 planting crops again.

A weekly market at the farm proved so popular that the the event needed to find a new location to not damage the historical buildings.

Today, you can sample a variety of local produce at the official residence of the Western Cape Premier. Premier Helen Zille made the offer to her "neighbours" when the market faced potential closure. Leeuwenhof is a wonderful setting to enjoy a Saturday morning market wandering through the stalls, relaxing under the trees or taking a dip in the swimming pool.

The market operates every Saturday from 9am to 2pm at Leewenhof and you can take part in the harvest on the first Wednesday of the month at the farm itself. You can follow them for updates via their Facebook page.

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