One iceberg, two pictures. Was one of the pictures a stolen copy?

Use the slider to compare the images. Credit: Sarah Scurr (left); Marisol Ortiz Elfeldt (right)

In a surreal way to demonstrate that there are a lot of cameras in the world, take a look at the images above. They were taken in 2006 while on board a ship sailing through an ice field off the coast of Chile.

One of the images (Sarah Scurr's) was submitted to a photo contest on the Telegraph's website. It was selected as one of the top pictures for the week in 2009 when it was submitted.

Last month a claim was made that the image belonged to a Chilean journalist. The Telegraph investigated.

After checking the additional information attached to the pictures it was established that they were in fact two pictures taken at almost the same time of the same thing only metres apart.

Both Sarah Scurr and the Chilean journalist Marisol Ortiz Elfeldt were on the ship and happened to take the same picture.

You can expect this to happen a lot more often from now on although the ease of copying a picture would still make plagiarism an even bigger issue.

If you would like to see if or where an image of yours has been used you can try services like Google's image search that will compare the image you upload to the websites it has indexed with that image.


This article first appeared on 702 : One iceberg, two pictures. Was one of the pictures a stolen copy?


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
TED, three letters with a plan to change the world

TED, three letters with a plan to change the world

TED talks are like a Wikipedia of transformative ideas. Now they plan to turn ideas into action.

TVs are becoming so good, our eyes may not be able to perceive the improvements

TVs are becoming so good, our eyes may not be able to perceive the improvements

When technology exceeds humanity's' capacity to use it

Surviving disruption - two global brands that dodged the bullet

Surviving disruption - two global brands that dodged the bullet

Disruption almost killed a 70-year-old toy company and a 250-year-old publisher.

The trouble with having a name that computers regard as rude

The trouble with having a name that computers regard as rude

When Natalie Weiner tried to register for a web service the site's validation said her surname was offensive, and she's not alone.

Three moonshots that could change the world

Three moonshots that could change the world

A material that could turn friction into fiction; a bee to end our dependence on plastic and a single atom transistor.

To buy or not to buy? That is the question

To buy or not to buy? That is the question

The pros and cons of subscribing to versus buying digital content.

Popular articles
ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

Associate Professor of Law at Wits University James Grant says the ConCourt did not define what private use was.

'What took big banks so long to shut Gupta accounts?', Pieter-Louis Myburgh asks

'What took big banks so long to shut Gupta accounts?', Pieter-Louis Myburgh asks

Journo Pieter-Louis Myburgh says other banking execs need to be questioned about their potential complicitness in the Gupta saga.

Cape Town dams on 70% for the first time since 2015

Cape Town dams on 70% for the first time since 2015

Cape Town's dam levels have hit the 70% mark but experts say Capetonians still have to be cautious in their water consumption.

'Cannabis should be given the same treatment as alcohol and tobacco'

'Cannabis should be given the same treatment as alcohol and tobacco'

Dagga Party's Gareth Prince on Constitutional Court handing down today's judgment on whether or not to decriminalise cannabis use.

[WATCH] Dad stops baby from crying, Emmy acceptance speech turns into proposal

[WATCH] Dad stops baby from crying, Emmy acceptance speech turns into proposal

Khabazela shares some of the most popular tweets, posts, and videos on 'What's gone viral'.

17-year-old learner killed teacher for not allowing him to jump the food queue

17-year-old learner killed teacher for not allowing him to jump the food queue

Spokesperson for Education department says the fact that this learner is still in Grade 10 at 17 may indicate there is a problem.