R19.5 million for a medal that crushed Hitler’s myth of Aryan supremacy

Jesse Owens is probably most famous for crushing Hitler’s myth of Aryan supremacy by winning four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

One of those medals holds the record for the highest price – a princely R19.5 million – ever paid for a piece of Olympic memorabilia.

SCP Auction sold the medal in 2013.

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Article brought to us by Old Mutual.


This article first appeared on 702 : R19.5 million for a medal that crushed Hitler’s myth of Aryan supremacy


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