Four facts about getting a C-section for women

One out of four women are delivering their babies via caesarean section (C-section) according to the last year's District Health Barometer report. Findings claim that C-sections have doubled since 2001.

With such a large increase reported in this method of delivery, private gynaecologist Dr. Peter de Jong focuses on some of the things that a mother-to-be should know before opting for a C-section:

1. C-section are performed under different circumstances.

Many women do have elective C-section by maternal choice, and of course others who have it thrust upon them.

Some women have elective C-sections which they have planned with their obstetrician or gynaecologist. Others have emergency C-sections as a result of increased risks to the natural birth during their labour.

2. Having a C-section once does not necessarily mean that all future births will be performed the same way.

De Jong says that those who have had an emergency C-section because the baby was disproportionate to their pelvis it is less likely for them to have natural births in future.

However, those who have had elective C-sections or as a result of breach or twins, a trial of natural labour is allowed.

3. There are certain increased risks involved with C-sections.

C-sections come with the increased risk that a child could possibly develop food allergies, gluten intolerance, asthma obesity or type 1 diabetes.

4. The later the C-section, the healthier the baby

According to de Jong, babies do better when a C-section is performed at 38 or 39 weeks and are generally healthier the later they are born.

He advises that women women always consult with their healthcare providers to fully explore their options. De Jong does not encourage that women polarise themselves using their preferred birth option, but rather suggests that they remain open to all possibilities.

Use your common sense, consider your options and always factor the outcome of the baby.

Listen to the conversation on the Redi Tlhabi Show below:


This article first appeared on 702 : Four facts about getting a C-section for women


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