Today's Big Stories

Opposition MPs: 'time's up Zuma'

Opposition MPs: 'time's up Zuma'

In Parliament, President Jacob Zuma and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) Leader Julius Malema will come face to face again as Zuma takes Parliamentary questions. The last time the President took questions, the EFF refused to accept his answers and started chanting 'pay back the money'. Last month, the entire EFF caucus was removed from the National Assembly by a group of men after an EFF MP asked Zuma about Nkandla during his State of the Nation Address. EWN Parliament's Gaye Davis:

Who knows what to expect, who knows what we're going to see this afternoon. The DA have gone away to their own caucus meeting, indications showing that they will also pursue the question first raised by the EFF on when the President would pay back the money that was spent on his homestead in Nkandla. This is also about the extent to which Parliament can hold the Executive to account.

[FIRST ON EWN] Meddling with Dramat suspension evidence

An EWN exclusive this morning details how a senior Hawks official went to a private law firm after claiming the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (Ipid) ignored evidence that appeared to clear Hawks head, Anwa Dramat. Dramat was suspended by Police Minister Nathi Nhleko over claims he was involved in the illegal deportation of Zimbabwean nationals. That suspension was then overturned. EWN's Barry Bateman:

The Hawks say he especially approached this private firm and he gave his statement to this Ipid investigator, who declined to take his statement officially. He wanted this document included in the docket that was set to be made to the National Prosecuting Authority.

Mamabolo on foreign nationals and housing

A Tuesday comment by Gauteng MEC for Human Settlements and Co-operative Governance Jacob Mamabolo is that foreign nationals should be provided with access to some form of accommodation when informal settlements are cleared out. The current understanding is that government does not provide alternative accommodation for foreign nationals when they are evicted at the moment. MEC Mamabolo expands on his stance:

The unfortunate part is the way this headline has been presented in certain media. The point is that, if we are eradicating informal settlements, can we afford to do that, if we are leaving certain people behind? Remember that not all South Africans quality for subsidies. We need a discussion about the eradication of informal settlements, without taking advantage of the current climate in the country that has aspects of xenophobia. The current rental stock - most of it being private - are mostly unaffordable, meaning many people are destined for slums. Backyard dwellings are increasing at a rapid pace and if we don't address this, we will be dealing with a massive informal state, because Gauteng has a huge (economic) pull.

Dropping The Gear?

In the UK on Tuesday evening, the BBC made an announcement that Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson has been suspended after a fracas with a producer: it’s claimed that he might in fact have punched someone. Motoring and technology journalist, Gus Silber:

Top Gear is a real phenomenon - it's full of rock-and-roll, reality TV elements. Clarkson has been highly controversial for a number of things; it's hard to imagine them putting a stop to it as it's the BBC's biggest money puller. What is likely to happen though is they might take it to another channel if the BBC drops it, which wouldn't be good.

Samro's 'lekker local' call

A Tuesday claim from the Southern African Music Rights Organisation (Samro) is that radio stations should be forced to play more local music to keep the royalty money paid by those stations in the country. Executive General Manager at Samro, Pfanani Lishivha:

We believe that radio stations should play more SA music because we find that distribute millions of Rands to musicians in the UK and the US and we get very little in return from there, because our music isn't being played much. We now have to ship money abroad to facilitate this. (On quality of SA music) that debate has been going on for 20 years, it's a chicken-and-egg situation; if you are not exposed to certain kinds of music, you won't know about it. Music compilers and some major record labels often argue that they play the kind of music that listeners demand. But again, people need to be exposed to a lot of different kinds of music.

Zulu King Zwelithini gets more 'mili's'

More reports have surfaced this morning, noting that Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini has asked for - and received - another R2 million to run his household. This comes after he finished his earlier allocation of R54 million for this financial year. Policy analyst and Heritage expert, Dr Somadoda Fikeni:

I do think that he's playing the same role as other kings might. The only thing is that he is dealing with provincial boundaries, making him the symbolic head of the province, with some people referring to KZN as 'The Zulu Kingdom". The definition of roles should be clearly defined, even within symbolism. It is the resentment and envy that comes from other traditional leaders around the country - especially those that have the same status of being kings.

Parents and the homework debate

A long discussion during 702's John Robbie Show noted the amount of homework being given to children, particularly in primary school. Freelance writer specialising in parenting issues, Mandy Collins:

I'm not an edcuation expert, but I am a mother who realises the importance of getting homework to reinforce what's been learnt at school. There's often scenarios where there's consistent homework over the course of one week and then the next week, there's nothing; some balance needs to be found. The teachers could look at the homework diaries, talk to each other and not overload all of the tests in one week, because children don't have the social skills to handle teachers. It seems there's an emphasis on quantity rather than quality.

Lines no longer blurred in Gaye posthumous win

In Los Angeles, a jury has ruled overnight that songwriters Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams did rip off deceased soul legend Marvin Gaye when they wrote their hit 'Blurred Lines', which was a big hit for Thicke and Williams in 2013. Music Guru, Sean Brokensha:

There's nothing new under the sun, and this also follows a recent case of Sam Smith vs Tom Petty. Mr Stripey Pants (Robin Thicke) could have handled it far better, but he decided to fight Marvin Gaye's camp. This goes back to September 2013, when Thicke decided to counter-sue, saying that 'Marvin Gaye didn't own the sound of the 60's', which was a very arrogant thing to say.

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