West Coast Rock Lobster (kreef) in the red

The World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF) has warned that the West Coast Rock Lobster (Jasus lalandii), commonly known as kreef, could disappear altogether within the next five years unless radical action is taken to save the fishery.

Pavitray Pillay, manager of the WWF SASSI program says after a rigorous assessment, the Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI) traffic-light system that helps consumers make sustainable seafood choices has placed the Rock Lobster on Red.

Our most recent assessment has put the Rock Lobster in a very red category. What that means is please don't buy it, don't eat it and don't catch it because it is in some serious trouble.

Pavitray Pillay, Manager of the WWF SASSI program

We are really worried that it might not be here in the next five years.

Pavitray Pillay, Manager of the WWF SASSI program

A campaign has been launched by the WWF South Africa, calling on consumers to “skip the kreef this summer”.

Pillay says unfortunately the government hasn't listened to scientific evidence and continued to issue out permits for fisherman to catch the Rock Lobster.

To hear more about the Rock Lobster, listen below:


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by NEWSROOM AI
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