Beach goers warned of higher than normal rip currents

The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) is urging beach goers to be cautious of rip currents as the new moon spring tide peaks tomorrow and as a result, higher than normal tides and strong rip currents are expected.

Shark activity is also heightened.

Rip currents are said to be very dangerous and one of the causes of drowning accidents.

Dr Cleeve Robertson, NSRI CEO says if caught in a rip current, don't fight it, just make sure to take deep breaths, wait for the current to pass or swim side ways.

He says beach goers need to be extra vigilant along the coast and make sure that children are supervised.

Always ask the locals for advice and ask lifeguards where it is safe to swim. Don't swim at beaches that are not life guarded.

Dr Cleeve Robertson, NSRI CEO

Robertson says people who are not experienced swimmers should not attempt to rescue someone who is caught in a rip current, rather throw in something that will help the person keep afloat.

To hear more on how to keep safe at beaches, listen below:


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