Grant payouts won't be affected by contractor deadline - Sassa

The South African Social Security Agency (Sassa) says it will file papers in the Constitutional Court on Thursday, seeking an extension of its contract with Cash Paymaster Services (CPS).

CPS was found to be an illegal service provider by the Constitutional Court and their tender contract to pay social grants ends in March.

If the contract is not extended in time, millions of South Africans who rely on the grants may not be paid when the agreement expires at the end of March.

Sassa's spokesperson Paseka Letsatsi explains that extending the contract is the best option for all parties.

Letsatsi says Sassa went through all the options and chose the one with the minimal risk for Sassa beneficiaries.

We are not going to put the lives of 17 million beneficiaries at risk. So we thought that the best option was to request that the ConCourt extend the contract so that we can have a phase-out process running smoothly.

Paseka Letsatsi, spokesperson of SASSA

Regardless of whether the court approves the extension, Letsatsi is adamant that no Sassa beneficiaries will be affected.

All Sassa beneficiaries will get their pay without any problems come 1 April 2017.

Paseka Letsatsi, spokesperson of SASSA

Take a listen:


Recommended

by NEWSROOM AI
Read More
Sassa roping court in to extend contract or disrupt payouts  - Corruption Watch

Sassa roping court in to extend contract or disrupt payouts - Corruption Watch

Sassa is approaching the ConCourt to extend its contract with CPS for at least one year and Corruption Watch says its manipulative.

16 million South Africans rely on Sassa grant payouts, and its all up in the air

16 million South Africans rely on Sassa grant payouts, and its all up in the air

Dept of Soc Dev still wants service provider Cash Paymaster Services to disperse Sassa social grants despite ConCourt ruling.

Companies who bid to take over payments did not comply - Sassa

Companies who bid to take over payments did not comply - Sassa

Sassa says approaching the ConCourt to extend contract with CPS is the least-risk option to ensure grant beneficiaries are paid.

Sassa off to ConCourt to extend CPS contract

Sassa off to ConCourt to extend CPS contract

Despite 2014 ConCourt ruling that Cash Paymaster Services tender was unlawful, SASSA says the contract will ensure grants are paid.

Social grant payouts will not be hampered by CPS contract ending says Sassa

Social grant payouts will not be hampered by CPS contract ending says Sassa

Sassa dismisses claims that grant payments will be affected when its contract with Cash Payment Services ends in March next year.

Popular articles
'Let’s tax this thing and make money out of it!'

'Let’s tax this thing and make money out of it!'

The Money Show's Bruce Whitfield interviews Jeremy Berke (Business Insider) and Unathi Henama (Tshwane University of Technology).

Concourt ruling on cannabis needs to filter down to cops, says dagga couple

Concourt ruling on cannabis needs to filter down to cops, says dagga couple

Myrtle Clark and Julian Stobbs, dubbed the dagga couple, have been trying for years to have dagga legalised.

Kaptein Kurt Darren on music and all the money he’s making from it

Kaptein Kurt Darren on music and all the money he’s making from it

Laat die dansvloer brand! The Money Show’s Bruce Whitfield interviews Afrikaans musician Kurt Darren.

ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

ConCourt rules dagga legal for private use, but what is private?

Associate Professor of Law at Wits University James Grant says the ConCourt did not define what private use was.

Cape Town dams on 70% for the first time since 2015

Cape Town dams on 70% for the first time since 2015

Cape Town's dam levels have hit the 70% mark but experts say Capetonians still have to be cautious in their water consumption.

Should SA review the parameters of affirmative action?

Should SA review the parameters of affirmative action?

Ralph Mathekga says the experience on the ground shows that there is a problem when it comes to framing affirmative action.

17-year-old learner killed teacher for not allowing him to jump the food queue

17-year-old learner killed teacher for not allowing him to jump the food queue

Spokesperson for Education department says the fact that this learner is still in Grade 10 at 17 may indicate there is a problem.