John Maytham's book review: Music, murder and mischievous children

John Maytham reviews his book picks for the week...

When the Music's Over by Peter Robinson

A baffling murder on a remote country lane puts Alan Banks and his team to the test in the detective’s most intense and gripping case yet – from an author hailed by Louise Penny as “a writer at the top of his game.”

With Detective Inspector Annie Cabbot investigating the young woman’s death, newly promoted Detective Superintendent Banks finds himself taking on the coldest of cases: a fifty-year-old assault allegedly perpetrated by beloved celebrity Danny Caxton. Now Caxton stands accused at the center of a media storm, and it’s Banks’ job to discover the shocking truth.

As more women step forward with accounts of Caxton’s manipulation, Banks must piece together decades-old evidence – as the investigation leads him down the darkest of paths…

The World's Worst Children by David Walliams

From the world's favourite author, David Walliams, 10 cautionary tales and a delightfully dreadful cast of characters, all hilariously read aloud by the author himself!

Are you ready to meet the world's worst children? Five beastly boys and five gruesome girls!

Like Sofia Sofa - a TV superfan so stuck to the sofa that she's turning into one! Or Dribbling Drew - a boy whose drool gets him into trouble on a school trip! And don't forget Blubbering Bertha - a girl who bawls and tells terrible tales!

Also featuring a special appearance from fan favourite Raj!

From number-one best-selling author David Walliams comes this collection of wickedly funny, deliciously mischievous tales. Suspenseful, powerful, and surprising, When the Music’s Over is the finest novel to date from one of the foremost suspense writers at work today.

The Relatively Public Life of Jules Browde by Daniel Browde

I sat there divided. Though my grandfather was visibly shaken by the force of this memory, I felt a bubbly thrill because this was such good stuff, and I remember turning my eyes away from his distressed face to make sure the wheels of the dictaphone were still turning.

When Daniel is tasked with writing the biography of his grandfather, Jules Browde – one of South Africa’s most celebrated advocates – he sharpens his pencils and gets to work. But the task that at first seems so simple comes to overwhelm him. As the book recedes – month after month, year after year – he must face the possibility of disappointing his grandfather, whose legacy now rests uncomfortably in his hands.

The Relatively Public Life of Jules Browde is more than the portrait of an unusual South African life, it is the moving tale of a complex and tender relationship between grandfather and grandson, and an exploration of how we are made and unmade in the stories we tell about our lives

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John Maytham's Book Reviews: Murderers, weed dealers, social justice activists

John Maytham's Book Reviews: Murderers, weed dealers, social justice activists

John's three book picks for the week.

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