Eliminating school hair policies may reduce discrimination

The hair policies in South African schools have been the subject of heated debate. Incidents of black students being targeted for having 'unruly' hair and punished or sent home unless they conform to the school rules began hitting the headlines in 2016 at Pretoria Girls High.

Now a new incident of discrimination has occurred at Windsor House Acadamy and Gauteng MEC for Education Panyaza Lesufi says he is dealing with the matter swiftly.

Eusebius McKaiser feels the rules regarding hair are steeped in white history and were not reviewed or changed to accommodate various hair types. He posed this questions to listeners: Should we eliminate hair policies in school to reduce discrimination?

The result was a heated debate on the need for school rules. While some people argued that schools are an essential part of a school, and hair rules are very much needed to teach children discipline, others felt that what a students hair looks like has nothing to do with their ability to learn.

Here are some of the listeners' comments:

The baby boomers had very rigid rules and conforming was the big thing. You had to do what the teacher said and show them a lot of respect. Today's generation Y is different. They are so caught up in technology that they don't care about what they look like. They just want to learn.

Selma, 702 and CapeTalk listener

I think its important the schools are allowed to enforce their rules irrelevant of any kids colour. It is supposed to instill a sense of responsibly in the children.

Tazz, 702 and CapeTalk listener

Hair policies in school are grooming children to be employed by corporates. The corporate would also does not welcome you if you have funny hair and look different.

Tami, 702 and CapeTalk listener

Listen below for the full open line:


This article first appeared on 702 : Eliminating school hair policies may reduce discrimination


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