The famous men that get away with violence

"There is a shockingly long list of male celebrities in the music, film, and sports worlds whose abusive pasts are regarded as hardly a blemish on their thriving careers."

These men accused of assault are often given a free pass.

As someone who works in the media space, Noxolo Mafu, Deputy Editor, HuffPost SA says it be challenging to perceive an artist or a revered personality as someone who is flawed.

He adds that to improve reporting on violence and the men who commit such crimes, the issues at the core, need to interrogated and unpacked further.

Mafu explains that at times, audiences aren't willing to see their favourite celebrity or politician being held accountable and often blame the media for threatening that person's livelihood.

Khosi Jiyane, psychologist, says men in the media are often exempt from the normal rules of society because they are viewed as 'larger than life'.

We need to revisit our sense of self as a society and how we articulate ourselves.

Khosi Jiyane, Psychologist

By the time people become celebrities, they are socialised already. Firstly at home, in their communities and the media itself.

Khosi Jiyane, Psychologist

Popular South African actor, Sello Maake Ka-Ncube says he was only 24 when his abusive nature manifested itself.

He says he failed to understand how one moment he would tell his then partner how much he loved her and then become abusive to towards them a short while later.

The second time, I asked myself, what are you doing?

Sello Maake Ka-Ncube

Ka-Ncube goes on to say that incident took him on an introspective journey where he learned of his insecurities.

Listen to full conversation in the audio clip:


This article first appeared on 702 : The famous men that get away with violence


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