#WaterWatch

City explains what level 5 water restrictions mean for every household

Level 5 water restrictions have been implemented in the City of Cape Town, affecting both domestic and commercial water users.

The aim is to drop the City’s collective water use to below 500 million litres per day.

Read: Level 5 water restrictions in full swing

Mayoral spokesperson Zara Nicholson explains that the level 5 restrictions impose a limit of 87 litres of water per person per day.

The 87 litres of water per person per day is whether you are at home, school, work, gym or elsewhere.

Zara Nicholson, Spokesperson for Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille 

The new emphasis is capping excessive water use at the domestic household level and placing additional restrictions on the commercial sector.

Zara Nicholson, Spokesperson for Cape Town Mayor Patricia de Lille 

According to Nicholson, the commercial sector has increased water consumption instead of decreasing it.

The City wants commercial businesses to reduce water consumption by 20% compared to a year ago, or else they could face penalties.

The cap on individual domestic property usage is now set at 20kl per month, for households with 8 residents or more.

Also read: Enviro expert raises red flag with City's ground water extraction plan

The 87-litre quota and the overall collective target of 500 million litres per day in the city remain in place, Nicholson explains.

The City is also installing water management devices to cap the water usage of excessive users.

Nicholson has encouraged residents to continue using water responsibly and report non-compliance.

The City will automatically add fines and penalties to water bills to repeat offenders.

Fines are expected to be in the region of R5000 to R10 000.

Take a listen to the Level 5 water restrictions explained:


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