'Fees Commission Report fell far short of what students wanted'

The much anticipated Fess Commission Report recommends that students studying at tertiary education institutions be funded through a 'cost-sharing model of government guaranteed income-contingent loans' from commercial banks, regardless of their family background.

Economist Xhanti Payi believes the reason banks were preferred institutions chosen by the Fees Commission to offer loans to students is that they are easily accessible and would be more efficient in distributing funds than any other institution.

He says anybody can access the bank to apply for a loan, but because they are government guaranteed, it will no longer exclude people who are poor.

That guarantee from the bank is a much stronger guarantee than anything else because banks tend to trust government.

Xhanti Payi, Economist at Nascence Advisory and Research

Although Payi thinks the recommendations made by the Fees Commission could be feasible, they are far from what the students wanted or were expecting from the commission, which is free education.

Read: Banks can't lend money without expecting it back: Fees Report

I think the question the commission strongly dealt with, was to make sure that everybody has access to education. I don't think they have come close to what the students wanted which is free education.

Xhanti Payi, Economist at Nascence Advisory and Research

To hear the rest of the interview, listen below:


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