High voice and data costs in the spotlight at Icasa symposium

The struggle over the high cost of voice and data services continues in South Africa as it continues to impact on people at all levels of society.

Everyone feels the squeeze - from the most vulnerable in townships/villages and far-flung rural areas to low and middle-income earners who simply cannot afford the data purchases needed to stay connected in today’s digital economy.

It is against this brief background that Icasa is hosting the Critical Thinking Forum on Wednesday under the theme 'Conversation on voice and data costs.'

The Forum is bringing different stakeholders under one roof to debate about the plight of consumers and discuss possible solutions to heed the call of making the cost of communication affordable.

Of the top six biggest African markets, South Africa’s data prices are by far the highest, charging on average between R100 and R150 per gig.

Speaking to Azania Mosaka, Icasa spokesperson Paseka Maleka said the reason it decided to host the data symposium, was as a response to the outcry from the people via a number of platforms.

We thought it was important for Icasa to have a conversation, not necessarily a regulation-making process because if you go through a regulation process, there will be comments from stakeholders and we would have to follow certain processes.

Paseka Maleka, spokesperson, ICASA

Listen below to the insightful conversation on data costs:


This article first appeared on 702 : High voice and data costs in the spotlight at Icasa symposium


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