Impose tougher regulations on Netflix and co, not us, says DStv

Pay TV giant MultiChoice has argued that streaming services such as Netflix need to be regulated, or else they could threaten thousands of jobs in South Africa.

Also read: Icasa plans to open pay-TV market

Communications and broadcast regulator Icasa has been holding public hearings on an inquiry into subscription television broadcasting services such as Netflix.

MultiChoice subsidiary DStv says it is facing intense competition from Netflix and other online on-demand services like Amazon Prime Video.

Read more: SA spoilt for choice as Amazon drops streaming service

DStv claims it is unfair that the streaming services don't contribute to the Universal Service and Access Fund (USAF) or pay licence fees, explains tech expert Duncan McLeod.

McLeod says Netflix and others are starting to pose a competitive threat to DStv's premium subscriber base.

DStv says this competition is grossly unfair because Netflix and the others do not have to contribute to the USAF or pay broadcasting licences to the regulator.

Duncan McLeod, TechCentral Editor

DStv says it's the streaming providers that need to be regulated more, not them.

Duncan McLeod, TechCentral Editor

There's strong consumer sentiment against MultiChoice.

Duncan McLeod, TechCentral Editor

Take a listen to his reflections on the industry:


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