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[VIDEO] 'The Most Expensive Sunset' highlights Cape Town's spacial inequality

17 October 2020 11:52 AM
Tags:
Cape Town
APARTHEID
spacial inequality
short film
The Most Expensive Sunset
Breeze Yoko
spatial apartheid
social commentary

Artist Breeze Yoko's new short film illustrates the effects of spatial apartheid through the eyes of a young homeless person.

Filmmaker and multi-disciplinary artist Breeze Yoko describes himself as a full-time student of the UniverCity of Life, where he is currently undertaking a Phd in Streetology.

Cape Town is often cited as a city that harshly illustrates the fact that South Africa is still one of the most unequal countries in the world.

Yoko's new short film 'The Most Expensive Sunset' illustrates the effects of spatial apartheid through the eyes of a young homeless person.

Screengrab from Breeze Yoko's short film 'The Most Expensive Sunset'

The artist says it's difficult for him to describe his film as he's so close to it.

It's somebody else's observation of a place that is usually unavailable to him and he has made it available to himself.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

It's a homeless kid that I was fortunate to meet... From my conversations with him and recorded conversations, he makes an observation about the place that he occupies.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

In [a place like] Monwabisi you probably won't see the sunset because of the way it is (chuckles) and Camps Bay, where the sun actually does set - there's a difference, definitely.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

So in order for those communities to actually see a sunset, they need to find themselves in a different space.

It would be hard for a viewer to miss the film's social commentary on how Cape Town's cosmopolitan public spaces are being used, comments Zain Johnson.

It's very hard for somebody who lives in Khayelitsha to go to Camps Bay to get the sunset. As much as these places are supposedly open to the public, access to them or getting to them is a very hard thing.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

Cape Town is a very obvious place where geographic apartheid is very alive... When you are in Camps Bay or in Sea Point you get to see who gets to enjoy the sunset.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

Yoko says for many people in South Africa, things have not changed much since the fall of apartheid.

A lot of that has to do with the fact that people never volunteered to go to the townships. They were forced to go to the townships... to be in the homelands.

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

Once apartheid supposedly ended it was expected for us to now adopt a volunteered shifting of space... They talk about willing buyer, willing seller... Without a force of change, change doesn't happen naturally

Breeze Yoko, Artist and filmmaker

Listen to Yoko in conversation with Zain Johnson:


17 October 2020 11:52 AM
Tags:
Cape Town
APARTHEID
spacial inequality
short film
The Most Expensive Sunset
Breeze Yoko
spatial apartheid
social commentary