#WaterWatch

Water released from Berg River Dam replenishes supply for West Coast towns

Government has confirmed that the Misverstand Dam now sits at 61.01%.

The National Water and Sanitation Department released water from the Berg River Dam to the Misverstand Dam along the West Coast.

The water was released on 17 April to alleviate the water crisis along the West Coast.

Read more: Water to be released from Berg River to Misverstand Dam to avoid Day Zero

Dams in the region where critically low and, at the time, ran the risk of running dry by 24 April.

5 million cubic metres was released from the Berg River Dam, explains the department's special projects deputy Trevor Blazer.

Also read: Invasive alien vegetation a major threat to Cape dam levels - scientist

Blazer says officials anticipated a water loss of 3 million cubic metres, but only lost 2 million cubic metres.

He says the water reached the Misverstand Dam before any expected difficulties getting water into West Coast towns.

It went better than we expected.

Trevor Balzer, Deputy Director- General of Special Projects at Department Of Water And Sanitation

We started the release on the 19th of April and the water reached the dam on the 24th of April.

Trevor Balzer, Deputy Director- General of Special Projects at Department Of Water And Sanitation

We've got a few million cubic metres into the dam to alleviate the plight for the West Coast municipalities.

Trevor Balzer, Deputy Director- General of Special Projects at Department Of Water And Sanitation

We took the equivalent of about 4% of the capacity at the Berg River Dam. With good rains we've had, the Berg River Dam has picked up again.

Trevor Balzer, Deputy Director- General of Special Projects at Department Of Water And Sanitation

Take a listen to the #WaterWatch update:


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Read More

Invasive alien vegetation a major threat to Cape dam levels - scientist

Alien trees currently reduce water supply to dams by over 100 megalitres per day, says biodiversity scientist Jasper Slingsby.

Cape rains have made a slight dent on the drought says national water dept

Spokesperson for the Department of Water Affairs Sputnik Ratau says two good rainy seasons are needed to turn things around.

WC residents urged to save water despite recent rains

Despite this, Environmental Affairs MEC Anton Bredell has reiterated a call on citizens to continue saving water. The average dam level stands at 16.6%, up from 15.8% last week.

Dept opens Berg River sluice gates opened to replenish Misverstand Dam

The Berg River Dam is at 41% while the Misverstand Dam is at 13.75%, which is critically low.

Water to be released from Berg River to Misverstand Dam to avoid Day Zero

Government has put plans in place to prevent the Misverstand Dam from running dry in a week's time.

WC govt says drop in dam levels remains a concern

The average level for dams across the Western Cape stands at 17.1%. Last year this time, the dams were at 23.3%.

'CT residents billed for water management devices when they ignore restrictions'

Some locals have complained about the involuntary installation, which costs them R4000 each. Councillor Xanthea Limberg explains.

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