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Rapper Jerome Rex in studio

Rapper Jerome Rex in studio

Guest : Jerome Rex

Jerome, who hails from Kuilsriver, recently scooped two Ghoema Awards two months
ago (April 2019) in Johannesburg.
He will make for an interesting chat about the following topics:
Jerome will be releasing the music video to his song, EK SAL, in July.
His recent win at the Ghoemas in April and what that meant to him and for his career -
also chatting about future music projects for 2019.
How his music has grown from being just a dream to now a career and passion as an
award-winning national artist.
His journey as a musician – the sacrifices, how tough it is to be a husband and dad and
still touring and performing across the country.
Some of the lessons learnt as a musician, artist and businessman.
ADDITIONAL INTERESTING FACTS:
Jerome Rex, a rapper and neo-soul singer/songwriter has defended the rich legacy of
hip hop culture in Cape Town by bringing home the Ghoema Award for Beste
Afrikaanse Hip Hop Album.
His winning album, Al Jerome, is a passion project that samples the music of Al Jarreau,
over which Jerome has written his own original music.
The project was financed by a crowdfunding campaign on the popular Thundafund
platform, making it a massive team effort by everyone who contributed financially to
get it off the ground.
The album beat out competition from fellow nominees HemelBesem, Early B and YOMA
to take home this prestigious accolade. Being the only nominee based in Cape Town,
this is a proud day for Afrikaans hip hop in the city.
NEW MUSIC VIDEO TO LAUNCH IN JULY 2019
EK SAL is the second single off the AL JEROME* album, after Boogie Up was released at
the beginning of the year.
This track was produced by JK of Exilic Music, and samples the Al Jarreau song Alonzo.
It also features a guest appearance by Hakkiesdraad Hartman, whose wisened vocal
intonations dance over the smooth, soulful sounds with poetic grace.
Jerome and Hakkiesdraad have recently finished shooting a music video for the song,
and are planning two launch events - 6 July at the Monroe Theatre in Mossel Bay, and
on 13 July at the Doubletree Conference Centre in Woodstock, Cape Town.
Because Hakkiesdraad is a resident of George, the two events aim to highlight the
collaborative manner in which the song came about, and also to celebrate ongoing
collaboration between artists from Cape Town and the Garden Route.
You can download the single here: http://jeromerex.co.za/new-al-jerome-single-ek-sal/
*AL JEROME is the latest studio album from award-winning rapper and singer Jerome
Rex. The project exclusively samples the music of Al Jarreau, over which Jerome has
written his own original songs.
You can stream the full album here: http://jeromerex.co.za/al-jerome-stream-all-thesongs/
JEROME REX BIOGRAPHY
Jerome fuses classical Motown sounds with neo-soul and rap to create a sound that
reflects the cultural melting pot that is Cape Town.
Notable achievements include the 2019 Ghoema award for Beste Hip Hop Album with
his recently-released project, Al Jerome. He also boasts 2 previous Ghoema award
nominations for Beste Afrikaanse Hip Hop Liedjie Van Die Jaar 2017 and 2019. Jerome
has had multiple singles charting on Good Hope FM’s Hip Hop Top 30, with 2 of them
peaking at No.1.
These and other singles also charted on local radio stations Bush Radio and CCFM, and
continue to enjoy airplay on community radio stations around the Western Cape.
A career highlight was performing at the Oppikoppi festival alongside his childhood
hero DJ Ready as part of a Brasse Vannie Kaap tribute. Other notable festival
appearances include Suidoosterfees and KKNK, where the production he was involved
in (Rymklets van Oos tot Wes) won a Kanna award for best musical production.
He also appeared in Die Riel Van Hip Hop, another theatre production that earned a
Fleur du Cap award for best musical production.



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#BeautifulNews

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Andrew Thompson, The Cost of Chopped Veggies

11 November 2019 9:02 PM

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