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#BeautifulNews

Guests :
Omphile Mabitsela
Can paper animals solve unemployment? Omphile Mabitsela believes so. After seeing
people living on the street, the seven-year-old resolved to start his own business, create
jobs, and combat poverty. Not when he’s older. Now. Mabitsela is set on his goal, and is
already building a stationery empire from the ground up.
The budding mogul trades in handmade bookmarks, which he calls quirk quirks. Using
an array of craft materials, Mabitsela fashions the bookmarks from origami animals
ranging from birds to pigs, as well as emojis and television characters. He sells them for
R10 each, along with other stationery through his company Quirk Quirk Inc.
So far, Mabitsela has sold over a thousand quirk quirks, and even recruited two friends
to help with the growing demand.
Mabitsela plans to expand his initiative in the future, designing an assortment of
products and partnering with courier companies. Committed to his dream, the
precocious entrepreneur shows what it means to pursue a venture for the greater good.
It takes creativity to tackle South Africa’s problems. And this boy means business.
Namgamso Xaso
Music is a divine element. For something that can’t be touched or seen, it can have a
powerful impact. When 14-year-old Namgamso Xaso ignited her talent as a
saxophonist, she began sharing her gift in an unusual way.
Venturing to animal shelters, Xaso plays smooth melodies while homeless dogs sway in
tune.Many rescues in shelters don’t find forever homes immediately. Music holds the
ability to transcend despair in any form and bring comfort to them.
As a member of the Kronendal Music Academy, Xaso also plays for an orchestra and
jazz band. When she’s not practising or performing, she delivers her magic to other
sentient beings. It’s not always about what you have to give, but how you use your gifts
to light up a life.
Macy-Rose Heuff
At the age of eight, this violinist is certain music will take her far. Heuff’s growing talent
is already charming audiences. With the instrument in hand, she has the courage to
pursue her dreams.
Heuff knew she wanted to play the string instrument the moment she saw a
performance on America’s Got Talent. Five years old at the time, she begged for lessons.
Despite her initial reluctance, Heuff’s mother gave in. And it’s paid off. Since then, Heuff
has proven her flair for music, having won gold at eisteddfods and performed in
national concerts.
Though Heuff practises with unfailing discipline, she still wishes she had more time to
play her heart out. Heuff hopes to make it onto global stages one day. In the meantime,
she offers impromptu performances during breaks at her school, The Wykeham
Collegiate. As Heuff shares her musical knowledge, other pupils sing along to her tunes.
Bow to string, she’s creating a crescendo of happiness.
Krish Lewis
Did you know there are large, unexplained swarms of jellyfish along South Africa’s
coastlines? Most beachgoers know little about these sea creatures other than their
ability to sting. Their misunderstood nature makes it difficult to appreciate and protect
them. The rich diversity of jellies swimming around remain largely unacknowledged
and unstudied. Krish Lewis, known as the “jelly guy”, is on a mission to discover more.
The marine biologist works at the Two Oceans Aquarium, where the jellyfish exhibit is
his focus. Lewis cares for a range of species, including the rare pink meanie jellyfish,
named for its colouring and love for eating other jellyfish. But his favourite is the
Benguela compass jelly, which is endemic to South Africa. Since 1997, scientists have
been trying to grow the species through all life stages in labs. Lewis became the first to
close the life cycle – a huge feat in cnidology.
Since 2012, he has been growing jellyfish from polyps – a stalk that develops from
fertilised eggs, then attaches to coastal reefs and pops off baby jellies. Lewis notes that
the most rewarding part of his job is watching them change physically. South Africa is
home to 20 species of ‘true’ jellyfish, which make up 10% of the global total. Many of
these remain misclassified.
By studying these life forms, we can ensure a balanced ecosystem. The bubble-like
organisms support a large diversity of underwater fauna and flora, which we’re
extremely lucky to have. Dedicated aquarists such as Lewis are revealing their value
and uncovering the mysteries of jellyfish.
Brittany Smith
When Brittany Smith learnt she was having twins, her excitement soon turned to worry.
Having been teased in school, Smith struggled with poor body image and low selfesteem
her whole life. But when she reached the third trimester of her pregnancy, her
mindset shifted. She gave birth to healthy girls and is now encouraging mothers to
embrace themselves as they are.
Pregnancy and childbirth are no small feats. To honour the strength it takes, Smith
teamed up with Durban-based photographer Michigan Behn to create a series of
intimate images. Women are captured showing off their bodies, complete with loose
skin and stretch marks. While magazines and social media place pressure on women to
lose weight straight after giving birth, these photos transcend the shame surrounding
postpartum bodies and champion authenticity. As she celebrates individuality, she’s
paying tribute to the wonder of motherhood.
The series has empowered Smith and freed her of the burden to appear an unrealistic
way. She hopes these photos will also show her daughters, who are now a year old, the
meaning of self-love when they’re older.Omphile Mabitsela
Can paper animals solve unemployment? Omphile Mabitsela believes so. After seeing
people living on the street, the seven-year-old resolved to start his own business, create
jobs, and combat poverty. Not when he’s older. Now. Mabitsela is set on his goal, and is
already building a stationery empire from the ground up.
The budding mogul trades in handmade bookmarks, which he calls quirk quirks. Using
an array of craft materials, Mabitsela fashions the bookmarks from origami animals
ranging from birds to pigs, as well as emojis and television characters. He sells them for
R10 each, along with other stationery through his company Quirk Quirk Inc.
So far, Mabitsela has sold over a thousand quirk quirks, and even recruited two friends
to help with the growing demand.
Mabitsela plans to expand his initiative in the future, designing an assortment of
products and partnering with courier companies. Committed to his dream, the
precocious entrepreneur shows what it means to pursue a venture for the greater good.
It takes creativity to tackle South Africa’s problems. And this boy means business.
Namgamso Xaso
Music is a divine element. For something that can’t be touched or seen, it can have a
powerful impact. When 14-year-old Namgamso Xaso ignited her talent as a
saxophonist, she began sharing her gift in an unusual way.
Venturing to animal shelters, Xaso plays smooth melodies while homeless dogs sway in
tune.Many rescues in shelters don’t find forever homes immediately. Music holds the
ability to transcend despair in any form and bring comfort to them.
As a member of the Kronendal Music Academy, Xaso also plays for an orchestra and
jazz band. When she’s not practising or performing, she delivers her magic to other
sentient beings. It’s not always about what you have to give, but how you use your gifts
to light up a life.
Macy-Rose Heuff
At the age of eight, this violinist is certain music will take her far. Heuff’s growing talent
is already charming audiences. With the instrument in hand, she has the courage to
pursue her dreams.
Heuff knew she wanted to play the string instrument the moment she saw a
performance on America’s Got Talent. Five years old at the time, she begged for lessons.
Despite her initial reluctance, Heuff’s mother gave in. And it’s paid off. Since then, Heuff
has proven her flair for music, having won gold at eisteddfods and performed in
national concerts.
Though Heuff practises with unfailing discipline, she still wishes she had more time to
play her heart out. Heuff hopes to make it onto global stages one day. In the meantime,
she offers impromptu performances during breaks at her school, The Wykeham
Collegiate. As Heuff shares her musical knowledge, other pupils sing along to her tunes.
Bow to string, she’s creating a crescendo of happiness.
Krish Lewis
Did you know there are large, unexplained swarms of jellyfish along South Africa’s
coastlines? Most beachgoers know little about these sea creatures other than their
ability to sting. Their misunderstood nature makes it difficult to appreciate and protect
them. The rich diversity of jellies swimming around remain largely unacknowledged
and unstudied. Krish Lewis, known as the “jelly guy”, is on a mission to discover more.
The marine biologist works at the Two Oceans Aquarium, where the jellyfish exhibit is
his focus. Lewis cares for a range of species, including the rare pink meanie jellyfish,
named for its colouring and love for eating other jellyfish. But his favourite is the
Benguela compass jelly, which is endemic to South Africa. Since 1997, scientists have
been trying to grow the species through all life stages in labs. Lewis became the first to
close the life cycle – a huge feat in cnidology.
Since 2012, he has been growing jellyfish from polyps – a stalk that develops from
fertilised eggs, then attaches to coastal reefs and pops off baby jellies. Lewis notes that
the most rewarding part of his job is watching them change physically. South Africa is
home to 20 species of ‘true’ jellyfish, which make up 10% of the global total. Many of
these remain misclassified.
By studying these life forms, we can ensure a balanced ecosystem. The bubble-like
organisms support a large diversity of underwater fauna and flora, which we’re
extremely lucky to have. Dedicated aquarists such as Lewis are revealing their value
and uncovering the mysteries of jellyfish.
Brittany Smith
When Brittany Smith learnt she was having twins, her excitement soon turned to worry.
Having been teased in school, Smith struggled with poor body image and low selfesteem
her whole life. But when she reached the third trimester of her pregnancy, her
mindset shifted. She gave birth to healthy girls and is now encouraging mothers to
embrace themselves as they are.
Pregnancy and childbirth are no small feats. To honour the strength it takes, Smith
teamed up with Durban-based photographer Michigan Behn to create a series of
intimate images. Women are captured showing off their bodies, complete with loose
skin and stretch marks. While magazines and social media place pressure on women to
lose weight straight after giving birth, these photos transcend the shame surrounding
postpartum bodies and champion authenticity. As she celebrates individuality, she’s
paying tribute to the wonder of motherhood.
The series has empowered Smith and freed her of the burden to appear an unrealistic
way. She hopes these photos will also show her daughters, who are now a year old, the
meaning of self-love when they’re older.



More episodes from Tonight With Lester Podcast

Simon's Town Ghost Tours

19 November 2019 10:01 PM

Guest : Andre Liebbrandt

Are you afraid of ghosts? then maybe the Simons Town ghost Walk is not for you.
Andre Liebbrandt has been giving guided tours in the town for a couple of years and
during the walk will keep you entertained with stories of mass murder the mysterious
Lavender Lady who haunts the museum, butchering barbers and even exhumed
skeletons.
At R100 a person the walks takes place Friday and Saturday evenings, kids are also
welcome.

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Motoring with Melinda Ferguson

19 November 2019 9:32 PM

Guest : Melinda Ferguson

Our motoring correspondent Melinda Ferguson is in Johannesburg for the launch of the
new Renault Kwid

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Infecting The City

19 November 2019 9:07 PM

Guest : Sikhumbuzo Makhandula

Infecting the City has been going since 2007 and has become one of the longest running
public performance arts festivals in the country. Infecting the City feature local &
International artists performing in everyday public spaces.
Tonight we feature artist Sikhumbuzo Makhandula whose piece Zizimase is inspired by
the biographical narrative of Lydia Williams who was born into slavery at Zonnebloem
Estate, District Six.

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Shot in court

19 November 2019 8:48 PM

Guest : Tim Flack| Gun Owners South Africa
             William Booth| Criminal Lawyer

KwaZulu-Natal police are investigating the fatal shooting of a senior State advocate in
a courtroom in what appeared to be a "freak accident".
It is believed a loaded gun was brought into the courtroom as part of the evidence in a
case that was being heard in uMzimkhulu on Monday.
A bullet from that gun was somehow fired and Advocate Addelaid Ferreira-Watt was
killed.

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Susanna Kennedy : What is a cacao ceremony?

18 November 2019 10:07 PM

Guest :  Susanna Kennedy
              Nisreen Ismail 

What is cacao?
Cacao has been used in ancient ceremonies by South Americans (the Maya) for
thousands of years. It has an active ingredient in it called theobromine — which can be
translated to, ‘Food of the Gods’.
So it makes sense that cacao was given its sacred status, and enjoyed in communal
ceremonies by the Maya with their Gods.
The word cacao actually came from the Maya word Ka’kau, and the Maya word
Chokola’j — which means to drink chocolate together.
You probably already know that cacao comes from the cacao bean — which is also used
to make chocolate.
But the cacao plant is seen as a medicinal plant, and has been used for a number of
spiritual, medicinal and ceremonial purposes throughout history.
It’s different to chocolate?
Like I mentioned, cacao has a very different taste to the chocolate you’re probably used
to.
Milk chocolate usually only contains around 20–40% cacao, with milk and sugar
making up the rest of the ingredients. Ritual cacao is made from mostly cacao beans,
some water, cacao butter, and then mixed with a little bit of natural sugar to taste.
It is always consumed in a warm liquid form out of a cup or mug, and usually has a very
bitter taste to it. Different spices can be added such as chilli, cinnamon, nutmeg, or
vanilla, depending on what you like.
So when they say that eating chocolate is basically the same as eating a salad, because
it comes from a plant — that’s true, but only when it comes to raw cacao, and not your
typical selection box.
Cacao is naturally high in iron, magnesium, and B-complex vitamins — which gives it a
number of physical benefits as well as the spiritual benefits it has long been connected
with.
What can you expect from a cacao ceremony?
Shamanic healing is one of the oldest holistic healing practices, which has been used by
ancient cultures worldwide for centuries.
Cacao ceremonies are actually a type of shamanic healing, but they don’t have
hallucinogenic or “out of body” effects, unlike some of the other shamanic experiences.
Cacao ceremonies are rooted in helping to rebalance the energies within us, and
restore good health.
There are so many different ceremonies in existence today. Some will lead you a
journey of dance, while others will center on meditation and inner reflection.
Many cacao ceremonies will involve a group of people sitting in a sacred circle, taking
prayer, and setting intentions to be received. Each person shares what they want to let
go of, and what they are calling into their hearts.
This often involves opening up to complete strangers in the circle, and creates a safe
and intimate space where everyone’s fears, hopes, sufferings, and dreams can be
shared.
What we often find is that most of us humans have very similar problems and fears, as
well as hopes for our lives. This means that the people in the circle act as a mirror for
each other.
The ceremony the ends in dance, which allows the cacao to activate within the heart
and body, and create transformation.
Through opening the heart, cacao enables us to hear our true self, work through
blockages and past traumas, dissolve any pent up negative energy, and help us align
with who we truly are.
It’s also a wonderful time to give ourselves mental and physical space and peace. You
get to switch off, and retreat inwards, helping you to learn more about yourself, and
gain clarity on where you are and where you’re headed.

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Panel Discussion: History of the Chinese Community in SA

18 November 2019 9:44 PM

Guests : Francis Lai Hong | Deputy Chairperson of TCA |
              Taryn Lock | Founder of Proudly Chinese South Africa |
              Jacky He | member of the new immigrant community |

On 25 November 2019 The Chinese Association's (TCA) legal case against 12
respondents accused of hate speech, harassment and unfair discrimination will resume
in the South Gauteng High Court (sitting as an Equality Court). The case concerns a
series of comments made by individuals, which were posted on the Facebook pages of
Carte Blanche and the Karoo Donkey Sanctuary in early 2017. The case returns to court
after having started in March this year. At the court inquiry next week, TCA will present
evidence on the harmful, hurtful and discriminatory effects of these comments on the
local Chinese community.
The speech being challenged includes statements that Chinese people are “not human”,
are “vile and barbaric”, and that South Africa should “get rid” of the Chinese. Further
statements are that they should be “wipe[d] out” and that “we should start killing their
children”. .
TCA brought the case on behalf of over 40 organisations and prominent people from
across the local Chinese community, including the All Africa China Association,
the South African Chinese Enterprises Association, the China-Africa
Women's Association, the SA-Chinese People’s Friendship Association, the South African
Guangzhou Association of Trade and Cultural Exchange, and the Sino South African
Chamber of Commerce.

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Online daily deal sites aren't always as generous as they make themselves sound

18 November 2019 8:58 PM

Guest : Andrew Thompson

The daily deal has become a feature of online shopping in South Africa, with One Day
Only, and Takealot.com's Daily Deals sub-site offering deep discounts on popular
products.
The two companies advertise discounts, typically upwards of 30%, on 50 or more
products each day. The discounted products change daily, and the emphasis is on
urgency - campaigns around each site push customers not to miss out on the dramatic,
soon-to-disappear deals.
But as consumers have pointed out on websites like HelloPeter.com, the deals are often
not as big as advertised, and One Day Only has also been reprimanded – twice - by the
advertising regulator last year.
The Advertising Standards Authority ruled against One Day Only in the cases, saying the
company distorted the retail prices of products in order to make the discount look
greater than it actually is.

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The Business of Recycling

18 November 2019 8:43 PM

Guest : Eddie Kampher| Angels Training and Resource Centre |

Eddie Kampher set up a recycling opportunity for under-resourced communities in the
Northern Cape.
His Waste to Art programme teaches people how to sort, clean, bale and even create
functional furniture and art. A total of 30 entrepreneurs, who were previously homeless
or unemployed, are now selling to local buy-back centres and earning a monthly
income.
The programme provides them with new opportunities within the waste management
and recycling industry, cleaning the environment whilst creating employment and
better health and safety in their communities.

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Lindy Johnson in studio

14 November 2019 9:58 PM

Guest : Lindy Johnson

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Sea The Bigger Picture

14 November 2019 9:34 PM

Guest : Chris Kraus

Sea The Bigger Picture is a Cape Town based NGO started in 2018 by four friends with a
passion for the environment, their main focus is coastal environmental education and
ocean pollution awareness.
They organize beach cleanups by collaborating with businesses, other NGO's & local
communities.
They are also testing a new machine that filters micro plastics from beach sand, Joining
us in studio is Chairperson of Sea The Bigger Picture Chris Kraus.

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