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Beautiful News

16 October 2019 9:57 PM

Guest : Riyaad Avontuur

Riyaad Avontuur has been clean for 390 days and counting. But it’s been a long journey
to get here. When he got involved with the wrong crowd and started using drugs, life
became increasingly difficult. Avontuur spent 10 years in and out of rehabs and missed
out on being there for his family. Recovery isn’t instant. This time, Avontuur needed to
fill the days of sobriety with positive intent. He took up running alongside his daughter –
an activity that’s given both Avontuur and his community in Bonteheuwel a head start to
success.
Every time Avontuur and his daughter ventured out for a sprint, children would
approach them: "Uncle, can we come run with you?" he recalls them asking. Avontuur
realised the kids needed to occupy themselves and keep away from negative
influences. “There's so much more in my community beyond drugs and crime,” he says.
By approaching principals in nearby schools, Avontuur gathered learners who were
interested in athletics and eager to have someone coach them. Earlier this year, he
began the Bonteheuwel Central Athletic Club with just two members. It’s now grown to
over 60 children chasing their purpose.
Running the club has guided Avontuur away from his old vices, and towards a position
of leadership. His past has shown him how easy it is to veer off track. But it’s also taught
him it’s possible to move on, no matter where you come from. “I finally feel that I can
contribute something,” he says. Avontuur is turning each step of his recovery into great
strides, both for himself and the kids of Bonteheuwel.

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Beautiful News

14 October 2019 10:01 PM

Guests : Joy Cronje 
              Judy Strickland
              Joshua Swarts

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Beautiful News

7 October 2019 10:04 PM

Guests :

Tebogo Mabye
Tebogo Mabye was dreaming of success, even while living on the streets. His
hometown, Hillbrow, is synonymous with poverty, crime, and constant police sirens –
but also a community who refuses to give up.Though he wasn’t ashamed of being raised
in shelters, Mabye wanted more out of life.
After finishing matric, Mabye interned at Mould Empower Serve, an NGO that assists
impoverished people. At work, Mabye developed a penchant for the caffeine culture
that fuelled his co-workers. Whether chatting with each other or engaging in meetings,
people in the office always had a cup of freshly-pressed java in hand. With the
heartbeat of Hillbrow pounding inside him, Mabye envisioned starting a café. Exactly
two years after announcing his goal, he opened the doors of Hillbrewed Coffee Co –
named in homage to the place that inspired him.
Grace
Grace, a Brown Swiss cow, was in tremendous pain. She was just shy of five months old
when she fell off the back of a truck. Immediately after, another stroke of bad luck hit
her – a car collision. Her injuries, which included a dislocated hip, were critical.
Fortunately, Grace received a second chance at life. In the process, she made history.
At the site of the accident, Grace was extremely vocal. It was obvious that she needed
medical help. Grace was transported to Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, where she
became the very first cow to receive a hip transplant. After surgery, Grace arrived at
Asher’s Farm Sanctuary with a new skip in her step, moo’ing profusely as if to thank her
helpers.
If the accident didn’t happen, it’s likely that Grace would have been auctioned. Her
breed of cow is the second largest used for dairy farming. Once they stop producing
milk, they’re sold to become meat at the young age of four, only a fifth of their average
lifespan. Cows never forget this suffering. Now, Grace can live a long and loving life
under the care of those who value her welfare. Animals are sentient beings. They
deserve our respect.
Jesse Breytenbach
Jesse Breytenbach had too many friends lose the battle against breast cancer. The
disease is unrelenting and information about it is scarce, making each attack a strike
from the shadows. When people are diagnosed, they don’t always understand what
warfare their body is about to face. So Breytenbach is shedding light on the fear and
myths with something stronger – laughter.
In collaboration with PinkDrive, an NGO that raises awareness to ensure early detection,
Breytenbach created Girl Talk. The weekly comic strip is a humorous weapon
addressing questions, interjecting stigmas, and spreading messages of hope. The
primary characters of the comic, Thuli and Jo, represent the everyday lives of South
Africans as they steer conversations towards breast cancer.
The intimations braided into the colourful illustrations encourage those who aren't ill to
attend regular check-ups, all while helping patients deal with their reality.
Chanene van As
Children are our future leaders, but are we doing enough to prepare them? The youth
have the right to schooling. They also deserve additional resources that will open doors
later on in life. Yet unlike bustling cities, many smaller areas only have access to the
basics of education. Jamestown, a settlement on the outskirts of Stellenbosch, used to
be one of them. Until Chanene van As saw an opportunity to do what she does best –
facilitate the growth of young minds.
Van As founded the Green Door Project, an after-school initiative to assist primary
school girls who are at risk academically. With 18 years of teaching experience under
her belt, Van As helps children discover and develop their talents. Between four and five
in the afternoon, they learn to use their time constructively by choosing from a range of
creative classes and participating in environmental exercises such as recycling and
gardening.
Tony Miyambo
How do you express your truth? Tony Miyambo uses theatre to channel authenticity.
Each of his globally-renowned shows displays the power of performance when it comes
from an honest place. But keeping intentions pure can be tricky in an industry where
acts are shaped to fit what society wants to see.
In the harmony of poetry and acting, he found his calling. His father’s encouragement
was the catalyst to Miyambo’s future as a performer. When he passed away, Miyambo
created The Cenotaph of Dan wa Moriri. The one-man act recreates his unabated grief
and pulls at the audience’s heartstrings. By writing, directing, and acting in his own
productions, Miyambo fully inhabits his characters. The stage becomes a foundation of
purpose and a space to work through issues of racism, suffering, and transformation.
Aaniyah Omardien
Talking about marine conservation isn’t enough. The shocking state of our beaches
demands immediate action. At coastal rock pools across the world, octopus, starfish,
and anemone compete for space with cooldrink bottles, sweet wrappers, and fishing
gut. These plastic items absorb harmful chemicals and pollutants. Over time, they break
down and are ingested by sea creatures, bringing toxins into the food chain. A crisis of
this magnitude warrants a collective movement. Aaniyah Omardien is gathering the
masses to clean up this mess.
In 2015, Omardien founded The Beach Co-op, a non-profit organisation committed to
keeping South Africa’s seas healthy and plastic-free. The all-female team meet with
volunteers every new moon to remove pollution from Surfer’s Corner on Muizenberg
Beach.
As an environmental scientist, Omardien also hosts events to track the ‘Dirty Dozen’, a
selection of marine refuse that repeatedly washes up. This includes items such as
earbuds, lighters, and lollipop sticks. Collecting and recording the debris allows
Omardien’s team to observe the levels of trash in the water. With data, they can
substantiate the urgency for a response.

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#BeautifulNews Winner

2 October 2019 10:03 PM

Guest : Ahneesh Valodia

Ahneesh Valodia’s love for Bollywood dancing lights up his eyes and ignites his soul. At
the age of eight, he began learning moves intrinsic to the genre by watching Bollywood
movies. As the vibrant colours saturated the screen, Valodia’s hands would mimic the
extravagant gestures. He dreamt of performing the Indian art form on stage for the rest
of his life. Then Valodia was diagnosed with muscular dystrophy. The degenerative
muscular disorder confined him to a wheelchair, rendering him unable to perform.
But Valodia would not let go of his passion.
To keep it in his life, Valodia founded Taare, an academy located in Cape Town that
unites young people in the preservation and promotion of Bollywood dance. In addition
to creating this platform for budding performers, Valodia is also the artistic director and
choreographer of the troupe. With his knowledge of various Indian dance styles,
Valodia fuses these forms to create a unique experience that portrays its diversity.
Taare have performed their crafted shows at prestigious establishments such as the
Artscape Theatre Centre and Taj Hotel. They’ve also contributed to fundraisers for
cancer awareness and autism. In pursuing the life he’s always wanted, Valodia is
empowering others.

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Beautiful News

25 September 2019 10:04 PM

Guests :

Nazeema Jacobs
Nazeema Jacobs never imagined herself blossoming like this. After leading a life of
non-stop clubbing and drug addiction, everything took a turn for the worse. For five
years, she had nowhere to live but the streets of Cape Town. Her story isn’t an isolated
case. According to the Western Cape Government, there are close to 5 000 people who
are homeless in the city. Simply providing shelter and handouts isn’t working. So how do
we end the cycle of homelessness and addiction?
Three years ago, Jacobs joined Streetscapes, a gardening project that rehabilitates and
uplifts the homeless. Their urban garden grows vegetables to be sold to local
businesses and is tended by people who come off the street. The profits, along with
donations, go toward paying these budding gardeners. Working the land, gently
planting each seed, and watering the crops has given Jacobs a routine, responsibility,
and an income.
Andile Qongqo
Andile Qongqo writes notes to remember. When the artist’s fingers sweep across the
keys of a piano, a stillness descends. The smooth sounds of jazz are his forte, and in his
hands, the genre takes on an African resonance. That’s because Qongqo is narrating his
own profound tale.
Growing up in the dusty streets of Mangaung, there were no music programmes
available. As a result, Qongqo only began playing the piano at the age of 15. To hone his
talents, Qongqo practised in churches and amateur bands throughout his teenage
years. Today, he expresses the struggles, tears, and joys that he has witnessed and
experienced through music.
Last year, Qongqo released his debut album, Q Signature, which received multiple
nominations at the 2019 Mzantsi Jazz Awards.

Denzil Pillay
Fashion should enhance our self-esteem. Instead, Denzil Pillay’s confidence was shaken
by the lack of larger clothing sizes. Pillay’s early experiences have influenced his
direction as a designer today – one who is committed to making garments for every
body type. Adorned with rhinestones, feathers, and tassels, his designs encourage
people to show off who they are rather than shy away.
He forayed into fashion in 2014 when he started experimenting with makeup
application and clothing design. Pillay’s hidden talent has since come out to shine. His
creations are made for everyday people, catering to all genders and sizes. The models
that sashay in his work aren’t reed thin. Instead, their curves accentuate the finer details
of the designs, while the outfits ramp up the wearer’s confidence.

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Beautiful News

28 August 2019 10:05 PM

Marilyn May
Marilyn May read the headlines – yet another infant abandoned. This is the fate of
thousands of babies every year in South Africa. In many cases, they’re born to mothers
who are in vulnerable positions themselves, and out of fear, shame, or confusion,
choose to leave their children. It’s a growing crisis that requires intervention on multiple
levels. The severity of the situation, coupled with the laborious foster and adoption
system, can leave anyone feeling helpless. But when May kept hearing about it in the
news, the registered nurse and doula yearned to help.
May became a trained safety mother – someone who has been screened by the
Department of Social Development to provide immediate temporary care for children
who’ve been found or rescued. She took in her first baby nine years ago.
In the past decade, she’s turned her home into a cosy haven filled with bassinets and
blankets, nurturing and attention. Dedicated carers work alongside May. Newborns
especially need a lot more than food and shelter. By having someone to hold their hand
and cradle them, they learn to bond and attach from an early age. Over 100 babies have
since gone to permanent homes through May’s organisation, Atlantic Hope.
Michael Mazibuko
When Michael Mazibuko speaks, hearts shatter. The thespian’s voice penetrates the
soul of all who listen. Mazibuko’s intensity stems from his history. He was kicked out of
home in matric after defying his father’s wishes for him to leave school. Mazibuko spent
countless nights fighting the biting cold. As time passed, he began to understand how
life on the street renders people invisible. But this dreamer grasped on to his hope for a
career in the arts – and it paid off.
In 2016, Mazibuko joined Johannesburg Awakening Minds, a troupe founded by Dorothy
Ann Gould. The award-winning actress uses theatre to upskill, uplift, and channel the
voices of those who are homeless.
At the Hillbrow Theatre, they perform Shakespeare’s timeless scripts. The depth in the
Bard’s tales, particularly his tragedies, relates to their experiences and enables them to
express their emotions.
Mazibuko and the J.A.M group are now making waves on screen. They’ve been extras for
South African soapie, Generations, as well as other short films. With the income from
their work, the actors have been able to find homes. But their biggest gain is the
restoration of their dignity. Each performance has shown them how much their voices
matter.
Jenny Cullinan
Jenny Cullinan is allergic to bees – but that doesn’t stop her from advocating for them.
Across the world, the insects are bred in hives for their production of honey. Cullinan
believes they deserve a bigger buzz. The precious creatures are responsible for
pollinating crops, and their wild nests are integral to functioning ecosystems. But
globally, bee populations are on the decline. As a conservationist and avid sculptor,
Cullinan is protecting South Africa’s colonies and promoting their role in nature.
Cullinan is a member of Ujubee, a conservation initiative dedicated to the Cape
honeybee.
In South Africa, nearly 85 percent of colonies exist in the wild. Cullinan fearlessly treks
into fynbos to find them, confident of their gentle nature. Cullinan’s knowledge and
commitment extends to her art. Delicately carving larger-than-life sculptures, she uses
the medium to express a deeper message. “Having exhibited everywhere from Maputo
to Berlin, she’s highlighting the significance of bees around the globe.
Husnaa Adams from Beautiful News joins us for this regular feature

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Beautiful News

26 August 2019 9:52 PM

Denisha Anand
A wetland rich in history runs through the Cape Flats. Legend dictates that a Khoi
princess was abducted here by Portuguese sailors. Her tears ran into the marsh, which
was named Princess Vlei after the tale. Flowing through Grassy Park, the site’s vital to
all who’ve lived near its banks. During apartheid, it was one of the few recreational
spaces for people of colour. Today, the wetlands are still an essential part of the
community, and at the forefront of protecting it is Denisha Anand.
As the biodiversity manager of Princess Vlei, she ensures its conservation. Anand
classifies the wetlands as a biocultural landscape – one that is both valuable for its
cultural heritage and ecological wealth. People swim, fish, and braai here, and the vlei’s
social importance has been passed on through generations.
When developers announced plans to build a shopping mall on the wetlands, the
community fought back. Princess Vlei is now a protected biodiversity site that Anand
oversees. While alien plants took over at one stage, the vlei is flourishing again under
her guidance. This year, Anand and volunteers planted over 1 000 indigenous plants.
Endangered plant and animal species such as the Cape Flats Dune Strandveld and
western leopard toad are also preserved here.
Brigitte Reeve-Taylor
The curtains part, the spotlight is on, and the dogs take to the stage. Lithe, elegant, and
graceful? Not these entertainers. But with tails wagging and paws tapping, they
certainly are charming. Affectionate border collies and energetic Jack Russels share the
podium, twirling around and leaping into the air. Their antics are raising the roof – and
much-needed funds – to improve the lives of their fellow canines.
Brigitte Reeve-Taylor is the mastermind behind the spectacle. In 2012, she rescued a
puppy off the highway and came face to face with the suffering stray dogs experience.
An established dancer and choreographer, Reeve-Taylor decided to change their
situation by using her skills and contacts in show business. She founded Dancers LOVE
Dogs to raise money for animal sterilisation – one of the most vital measures to prevent
the increasing number of neglected strays.
Jenny Cullinan
Jenny Cullinan is allergic to bees – but that doesn’t stop her from advocating for them.
Across the world, the insects are bred in hives for their production of honey. Cullinan
believes they deserve a bigger buzz. The precious creatures are responsible for
pollinating crops, and their wild nests are integral to functioning ecosystems. But
globally, bee populations are on the decline. As a conservationist and avid sculptor,
Cullinan is protecting South Africa’s colonies and promoting their role in nature.
Michael Mazibuko
When Michael Mazibuko speaks, hearts shatter. The thespian’s voice penetrates the
soul of all who listen. Mazibuko’s intensity stems from his history. He was kicked out of
home in matric after defying his father’s wishes for him to leave school. Mazibuko spent
countless nights fighting the biting cold. As time passed, he began to understand how
life on the street renders people invisible. But this dreamer grasped on to his hope for a
career in the arts – and it paid off.
In 2016, Mazibuko joined Johannesburg Awakening Minds, a troupe founded by
Dorothy Ann Gould. The award-winning actress uses theatre to upskill, uplift, and
channel the voices of those who are homeless.

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#BeautifulNews Winner

21 August 2019 10:02 PM

Guest : Marilyn May

Marilyn May read the headlines – yet another infant abandoned. This is the fate of
thousands of babies every year in South Africa. In many cases, they’re born to mothers
who are in vulnerable positions themselves, and out of fear, shame, or confusion,
choose to leave their children. It’s a growing crisis that requires intervention on multiple
levels. The severity of the situation, coupled with the laborious foster and adoption
system, can leave anyone feeling helpless. But when May kept hearing about it in the
news, the registered nurse and doula yearned to help.
May became a trained safety mother – someone who has been screened by the
Department of Social Development to provide immediate temporary care for children
who’ve been found or rescued. She took in her first baby nine years ago.
In the past decade, she’s turned her home into a cosy haven filled with bassinets and
blankets, nurturing and attention. Dedicated carers work alongside May. Newborns
especially need a lot more than food and shelter. By having someone to hold their hand
and cradle them, they learn to bond and attach from an early age. Over 100 babies have
since gone to permanent homes through May’s organisation, Atlantic Hope.

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Beautiful News's top 3 women

14 August 2019 10:02 PM

Guest : 
Zahraa Hendricks
Zahraa Hendricks had a game to win. To her, scoring tries was the challenge, not
wearing a headscarf. The young hijabi didn’t expect to make headlines in her first rugby
match. But when Hendricks ran onto the field, pictures of her were taken and posted to
social media. Instantly, they went viral. Hendricks’ amendments to her kit had caught
onlookers off-guard. For protection and as a symbol of modesty, Muslim women veil
their hair. Because of it, they’re often doubly painted with the stigma of being
oppressed.
Hendricks’ decision to play rugby tackles more than one misconception. “A lot of
Muslim girls may feel that there isn’t a place for them in contact sport,” she says.
Hendricks proves otherwise. The kit isn’t as covered as she requires, so she’s adapted
the gear to suit her needs. “The topic of hijab is constantly under scrutiny,” she says. But
in Hendricks’ team, the headscarf is seen as part of her identity – just as it is to her.
Bolekwa Salusalu
Bolekwa Salusalu has no hands, but she sews every single day. The 62-year-old is a
designer and creator of immaculately stitched wedding dresses, traditional outfits, and
school uniforms. Draped around her modest studio are a range of colourful garments,
each pattern more interesting than the next. Her friend Luluma Mnyute is perpetually
bowled over by Salusalu’s talent. Salusalu works tirelessly to provide for her family
from her home in the Eastern Cape, but she does it with style.
As a little girl, Salusalu watched her grandmother make her own clothing. She eagerly
soaked up lessons in sewing at school, but her family’s limited finances forced her to
drop out in Grade 8. In spite of this, the young seamstress pursued her passion and soon
blossomed into a talented designer. After working as a tailor for 28 years, she began
experiencing pain in her arm. Upon examination, doctors found that she had developed
gangrene. That year, Salusalu had both her right hand and her leg amputated, but she
kept on sewing. And even when she lost her left hand, she never gave up.
Despite the barriers she faces, Salusalu has come up with innovative ways to keep living
life on her own terms. Crickets chirp outside her window, and the whirr of the sewing
machine fills her room. Though surrounded by noise, Salusalu’s demeanor is always
calm.
Not one to be deterred from passion, Salusalu has made a point of proving the ease in
simply doing what needs to be done. Beyond dressing her community in the finest
fashions, she offers something far more profound to South Africa: inspiration. In just
being herself, Salusalu demonstrates how we can do anything we put our minds to, no
matter the limitations. “With my stompie,” she says, “I’m going to show you.”
Faith Mamba
Music was the first sign of Faith Mamba’s bright future. She didn’t know much about
melodies – except that they provided her with the warmth she yearned for. After
Mamba’s mother passed on, her grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. Foreseeing
the impending outcome, the matriarch placed the young girl in an orphanage. When her
grandmother died, Mamba was left to face life on her own. Social workers and
caregivers reached out by offering Mamba a host of recreational activities. In sonorous
sounds, she discovered profound comfort.
It was while attending a student concert at the Durban Music School that Mamba
noticed the saxophone. Her newfound interest drove her to enrol at the institution.
There, the shiny gold instrument fast became her favourite and enabled Mamba to
channel her emotions.
Mamba’s dedication has turned her life into a symphony. Today, the university student
has reached Grade 6 in Classical Music and remains loyal to the family that supported
her.

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#Beautiful News

12 August 2019 9:42 PM

Guests : 

Riyaad Avontuur has been clean for 390 days and counting. But it’s been a long journey
to get here. When he got involved with the wrong crowd and started using drugs, life
became increasingly difficult.
Riyaad spent 10 years in and out of rehabs and missed out on being there for his family.
Recovery isn’t instant. This time, he needed to fill the days of sobriety with positive
intent. He took up running alongside his daughter – an activity that’s given both he and
his community in Bonteheuwel a head start to success.
Every time Riyaad and his daughter ventured out for a sprint, children would approach
them. He realised the kids needed to occupy themselves and keep away from negative
influences. By approaching principals in nearby schools, Riyaad gathered learners who
were interested in athletics and eager to have someone coach them. Earlier this year, he
began the Bonteheuwel Central Athletic Club with just two members. It’s now grown to
over 60 children chasing their purpose.
Running the club has guided Riyaad away from his old vices, and towards a position of
leadership. His past has shown him how easy it is to veer off track. But it’s also taught
him it’s possible to move on, no matter where you come from.
***
Kierran Allen believe Durban doesn’t get enough credit. Despite its warm beaches,
balmy climate, easy-going folks, and art nouveau architecture, the seaside metropolis
seldom features among the country’s major attractions. Used to seeing it from every
angle, local photographer Kierran was surprised at how many others miss out on its
beauty. To showcase the splendour of the city, Allen embarked on a grand project.
Using his own funds, Kieran set about capturing the landscape with Warren Hill and
Nathan Pellow-Jarman, his partners at Novos Digital Cinema. Their drone shots offer
new perspectives of the environment, while time-lapses provide glimpses of the
changing cityscape. Dedicating up to five hours of shooting to every sequence, the
process of perfectly encapsulating Durban took two years to complete.
He's now collated his work into a three-minute film, Titled, Enter Durban, the video
received hundreds of thousands of views, an outpouring of appreciative messages, and
phenomenal acclaim. Locals and visitors alike were entranced by the landscape’s
unassuming charm. This year, Durban was voted Africa’s Leading City Destination by the
World Travel Awards. Allen’s work reveals the beauty that lies right before us.
***
Classrooms just got a whole lot cooler. The Department of Basic Education recently
announced that they’re introducing coding to the South African curriculum. But not
every school has access to computers. While some students are equipped with the
knowledge to contribute to the country’s technological growth, others lack the
resources to study even the basics. The results of this dichotomy become more
pronounced later in life. This was the experience for 17-year-old Nadine Maselesele to
boost their skills, Maselesele went back to her alma mater.
At Salt River High School, she began tutoring Maths and Science while advocating for IT
education. As a result of her efforts, Nadine was chosen as a fellow of the Facebook
Community Leadership Programme. She received the opportunity to visit Facebook’s
headquarters in California – and $50 000 to build a fully equipped computer lab at her
old school. The students can now develop their basic computer skills, complete
assignments, learn to code, and create online portfolios to assist their future job
applications.
Technology in the classroom can either be a major distraction or a great asset in
sparking interest. Resources like this allow students to take control of their education.
And Nadine has been instrumental in driving this development. Though she’s barely out
of high school, she hasn’t hesitated to give back.
***
Zahraa Hendricks had a game to win. To her, scoring tries was the challenge, not
wearing a headscarf. The young hijabi didn’t expect to make headlines in her first rugby
match. But when Hendricks ran onto the field, pictures of her were taken and posted to
social media. Instantly, they went viral. Hendricks’ amendments to her kit had caught
onlookers off-guard. For protection and as a symbol of modesty, Muslim women veil
their hair. Because of it, they’re often doubly painted with the stigma of being
oppressed. Zahraa says this is not true. And that she's free to choose for herself.
The kit isn’t as covered as she requires, so she’s adapted the gear to suit her needs. And
in her team, the headscarf is seen as part of her identity – just as it is to her.
. By sporting the hijab on the field, Hendricks breaks stereotypes and channels the
embracing attitude of South Africa’s people. Our unity escalates our freedom.
***
Music was the first sign of Faith Mamba’s bright future. She didn’t know much about
melodies – except that they provided her with the warmth she yearned for. After
Mamba’s mother passed on, her grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. Foreseeing
the impending outcome,her grandmom placed the young girl in an orphanage. When
her grandmother died, faith was left to face life on her own. Social workers and
caregivers reached out by offering her a host of recreational activities. In sonorous
sounds, she discovered profound comfort.
It was while attending a student concert at the Durban Music School that faith noticed
the saxophone. Her newfound interest drove her to enrol at the institution. There, the
shiny gold instrument fast became her favourite and enabled her to channel her
emotions.
Today, the university student has reached Grade 6 in Classical Music and remains loyal
to the family that supported her. Using her saxophone, she is creating her own
repository of resilience against adversity. As long as she has an instrument in hand, she’s home.

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