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[LISTEN] 'I spent 12 years in jail for a murder I didn't commit'

27 November 2018 3:49 PM
by
Tags:
Murder
BBC
black prisoners
true story

In 1990 Raphael Rowe was convicted and jailed for a murder he didn't commit. He shares his story with Sara-Jayne King.

Imagine being accused of a crime you didn’t commit.

Now imagine the crime was murder and that you were not only accused but convicted and sentenced to life behind bars.

That was the reality for Raphael Rowe, now a TV presenter and BBC investigative journalist.

In 1990, when he was 20-years-old, Rowe was convicted and jailed for murder in the UK.

After 12 years in prison fighting to clear his name, Rowe eventually had his convictions quashed and walked free from court.

He joined Cape Talk's Sara-Jayne King recently to share his story and to talk about his latest project - a Netflix series in which he embeds himself with inmates serving time in some of the world's toughest prisons.

Rowe speaks about the moment the jury announced the guilty verdict.

I was angry. I screamed, I shouted, I was dragged out of the dock and down to the cells and I didn't stop screaming and shouting in all those 12 years because I knew I didn't do what I was being held in prison for.

Raphael Rowe, journalist/presenter

The victims of the crime had described two white men and one black man, and yet three black men spent 12 years in jail.

Raphael Rowe, journalist/presenter

I was in a prison within a prison, because I was deemed an A-category prisoner, which is the highest category prisoner in the UK.

Raphael Rowe, journalist/presenter

On 14 December Rowe's latest project premieres on Netflix.

On 'Inside The World's Toughest Prisons' he embeds himself with inmates at prisons across the globe - experiencing first hand the living conditions inside the harshest penal institutions on the planet.

During the time he spends in each prison, Rowe is treated like any other inmate.

I am stripped of my identity. I am given a prison number and then I'm taken into the prison and handed over to the prisoners.

Raphael Rowe, journalist/presenter

These are places that don't have the resources to rehabilitate prisoners...in some cases, they don't even have the resources to feed the prisoners.

Raphael Rowe, journalist/presenter

Inside The World's Toughest Prisons premieres on Netflix on 14 December

Listen to the full interview below:


27 November 2018 3:49 PM
by
Tags:
Murder
BBC
black prisoners
true story

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