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City of Cape Town ordered Kataza's forced relocation, Cape Nature reveals

27 October 2020 8:58 AM
Tags:
City of Cape Town
julia wood
Kataza
Kataza the baboon
BTT

This was in a written affidavit filed by Cape Nature in Ryno Engelbrecht's court case against CoCT disputing the moving of Kataza.

A legal affidavit from Cape Nature has revealed startling evidence about who was behind the relocation of Kataza, the baboon from Slangkop, who landed in Tokai some 60 days ago.

Engelbrecht and other concerned citizens are asking questions about the decision Wood took 'under the authority of valid permits issue to its service provider.' How was this authorised if Cape Nature's Wild Animal Advisory Committee (WAAC), who has the statutory authority to make these decisions and issues permits, was not involved?

Historically, there has been a lack of clarity about who is responsible for baboon management in the City of Cape Town.

The City of Cape Town took SANParks and Cape Nature to court over this matter. The judge did not provide clarity but ordered the parties to reach an agreement.

And so in 2010 the Baboon technical team (BTT) was formed.

SANParks had made it clear it was not responsible for baboon issues outside of national parks, and so the City of Cape Town, SANParks and Cape Nature collaborated to create the Baboon Technical Team (BTT) comprising representatives from the City, SANParks, CapeNature, Cape of Good Hope SPCA, UCT's iCWIld, and the South African Navy.

The BTT protocols were drawn up as a guide for managing the situation.

The tender put out by the City of Cape Town for the management of baboons has bounced from NCC to HWS and back to NCC.

The tender places all responsibility on the wildlife management company to decide which baboons live or die based on what is termed 'raiding' protocols and charge sheets that then allow a baboon to be killed with seemingly no oversight.

Cape Nature has the statutory authority to issue permits for killings or forced relocations of males to other troops.

In the case of Kataza the male baboon relocated from his natal troop in Slangkop to Tokai, the question has been asked, who signed off on this decision?

Ryno Engelbrecht is currently involved in a court case in which he is suing the City of Cape Town in the High Court over the decision to remove Kataza from his home troop. He is making an application for Kataza to be returned to Slangkop.

Cape Nature, abiding the court's decision has filed an affidavit to explain its position though it is not opposing the application,

To this end, an affidavit has been received by Ryno Englebrecht from Cape Nature stating that the City of Cape Town's Biodiversity Manager Julia Wood made the decision to move Kataza.

Engelbrecht and concerned citizens are asking, by what statutory authority did Wood make such a decision?

RELATED: 'We kill 7 baboons a year, habitual raiders who are a danger to the public' - Julia Wood

Cape Nature's Wildlife Animal Advisory Committee (WAAC) has the statutory authority to issue permits, so did Cape Nature issue this permit?

City of Cape Town Environment and Spatial Planning Mayco Member Marian Niewhoudt repeatedly made statements that Kataza was relocated by BTT under dispersing guidelines.

So was the BTT and Cape Nature aware of the decision to relocate Kataza to Tokai?

For this and other trending stories listen to Barbara Friedman on Barbs Wire below:




27 October 2020 8:58 AM
Tags:
City of Cape Town
julia wood
Kataza
Kataza the baboon
BTT

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