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Vax and win: Could vaccine incentives work in South Africa? Researcher weighs in

17 June 2021 12:58 PM
Tags:
Science
Vaccination
vaccine hesitancy
Vaccination drive
vaccine incentives
Dr Marina Joubert

Morning Review host Lester Kiewit chats to science communication researcher Dr Marina Joubert about the use of vaccine incentives.
  • Several countries around the world are offering the chance to win cash, cars, and other incentives for citizens to get vaccinated
  • CapeTalk host Lester Kiewit asks if vaccine incentives could work in South Africa
  • Researcher Marina Joubert says there is room for SA officials to enhance the vaccination experience for eligible residents, however, effective vaccine communication remains a key priority
  • Listen to the interview in the audio above

Science communication researcher Dr. Marina Joubert says more evidence is needed about the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccine incentives around the world.

Here in South Africa, Dr. Joubert says there is an opportunity for vaccination centres to offer a more positive experience by perhaps providing recipients with a nutritious meal.

While other countries offer a chance to win cash, cars, and various prizes for their vaccine recipients, South Africa still grapples with vaccine supply constraints and misinformation.

Dr. Joubert says that government officials need to focus on implementing more effective science communication to help address any potential vaccine hesitancy in the country.

I've been thinking about these incentives and I think the important question to ask is: Does it really work? Does it make sense and is it ethical? Could it even backfire and make people more suspicious?

Dr Marina Joubert, Science Communication Researcher - Stellenbosch University

Personally, I would say, especially in the South African situation, I don't see any problem making going for a vaccine a positive experience like giving people a warm cup of coffee or even a nutritious meal while they're waiting.

Dr Marina Joubert, Science Communication Researcher - Stellenbosch University

But it probably won't work for people who are fundamentally opposed to vaccines in any case. In the end, I think it's more important to find out why people are hesitant and why they are concerned.

Dr Marina Joubert, Science Communication Researcher - Stellenbosch University

As we are waiting for these vaccines to become available, people have lots of time to think about it.

Dr Marina Joubert, Science Communication Researcher - Stellenbosch University

People's attitudes to vaccines appear across a spectrum, from those who actively demand it can't wait to get in that queue... to those who actively oppose it and reject it. In the middle, there are lots of people that are simply uncertain and a little bit hestitant. They need more information and they have some questions.

Dr Marina Joubert, Science Communication Researcher - Stellenbosch University



17 June 2021 12:58 PM
Tags:
Science
Vaccination
vaccine hesitancy
Vaccination drive
vaccine incentives
Dr Marina Joubert

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