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People don't want to change the narrative - Michael Holding on racial inequality

21 July 2021 9:07 PM
Tags:
Racism
Black Lives Matter
systemic racism
Michael Holding
racial justice
racial equality

Afternoon Drive host John Maytham chats to former West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding about his book "Why We Kneel, How We Rise".
  • Legendary West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding has released a book featuring contributions from famous black athletes
  • The book is titled "Why We Kneel, How We Rise" and confronts racism in sport and greater society
  • Holding says people around the world feel threatened by calls to dismantle systemic racism
  • He chats to CapeTalk host John Maytham about calling out racial injustice, the importance of black history, his views on taking a knee, and the #BlackLivesMatter cause

Legendary West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding says the idea of racial equality makes many people around the world feel threatened and uncomfortable.

The former cricketer turned respected commentator has published a book titled "Why We Kneel, How We Rise".

The book features contributions from famous black athletes, including former Arsenal striker Thierry Henry, track legend Usain Bolt, tennis star Naomi Osaka, and former Proteas fast bowler Makhaya Ntini.

RELATED: Black people shouldn't have to "perform their grief" online, says author

Holding first spoke out against institutional racism during a viral TV interview on why Black Lives Matter in July last year.

He says "Why We Kneel, How We Rise" is intended to have a more lasting impact on educating society on racism.

Holding says many black athletes have been ostracised for speaking out against racial injustice, from Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Olympics to former quarterback Colin Kaepernick

He says more education is needed about black history and black excellence to combat erasure from history and fight against the status quo of white supremacy.

RELATED: Jeremy Fredericks: Nothing will change if we don't confront racism in cricket

A lot of people do not want to understand exactly what the situation is. A lot of people are quite happy with exactly what is happening in the world and in their countries and in their lives and they do not want to see change.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author

That is the white privilege that they don't want to lose. They are very comfortable and if equality comes along they will not feel as comfortable because they think that they are losing something.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author

That's the problem with the world... It does not affect them adversely, so they don't want to hear it.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author

People do not want to change the narrative. People continue to hide the facts of black achievers. People continue to highlight one race supposedly being superior to another.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author

You don't hear anything about Lewis Latimer [who developed the carbon-filament light bulb]... The man who invented the three-way traffic light, another black man. You don't hear anything about him... The man who introduced inoculation to the Western world, black man... The first man to step on the North Pole was a black man, you hear nothing about him.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author

These things are purposefully hidden so that people of colour don't have role models to aspire to be like. And it's time those things are changed.

Michael Holding, cricket commentator and author



21 July 2021 9:07 PM
Tags:
Racism
Black Lives Matter
systemic racism
Michael Holding
racial justice
racial equality

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