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The skin is the body's largest organ - So take care of it!

18 September 2021 10:25 AM
Tags:
skincare
Dr Nomphelo Gantsho
Cape Skin Doctor

Weekend Breakfast presenter Sara-Jayne King speaks to Dr Nomphelo Gantsho, a registered dermatologist.
  • September is skin cancer awareness month
  • Repeated exposure to UV light could result in photoaging of the skin
  • Always apply a sunscreen with a minimum SPF 30 and examine any changes to moles on your body

Image: © rido/123rf.com

We all know about the importance of keeping the inner workings of our body healthy.

We may often hear about heart health, kidney disease, the importance of not smoking for the good of our lungs and drinking plenty of water to flush out the liver.

But many of us tend to neglect the largest organ of the body – our skin.

Known to her patients as The Cape Skin Doctor, Dr Nomphelo Gantsho is a registered Dermatologist focusing on all types of skin problems including, general, pediatric, surgical and cosmetic dermatology.

September is also skin cancer awareness month, so it's very important to look after our skin because all exposure can damage our skin, including the sun.

Dr Nomphelo Gantsho - Registered Dermatologist

Dr Gantsho says there are three major types of skin cancer, namely the basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Melanoma usually originates from moles on the skin, but it can also just appear from nowhere.

Be aware of your moles. Look at any changes on your moles.

Dr Nomphelo Gantsho - Registered Dermatologist

In terms of protection from the harmful UV rays of the sun, applying the correct sunscreen to your skin is vital.

SPF which stands for Sun Protection Factor, is a measure of how well a sunscreen will protect skin from UVB rays, the kind of radiation that causes sunburn, damages skin, and can contribute to skin cancer.

SPF creams need to protect you against UVA, UVB, visible light and infrared light.

The repeated exposure of ultraviolet radiation, primarily from the sun but also from artificial UV sources can also result in photoaging, the premature aging of the skin.

What is important is the SPF on your sunscreen, and what does it protect you against.

Dr Nomphelo Gantsho - Registered Dermatologist

As black people you do have an SPF of 13 on your skin, compared to a Caucasian that'll have a 3.4. That means, as a white person you need to have a higher SPF.

Dr Nomphelo Gantsho - Registered Dermatologist

Everyone needs at least a minimum SPF of 30. You not just protecting yourself from sunburn, you're also protecting yourself against photoaging.

Dr Nomphelo Gantsho - Registered Dermatologist

Scroll to the top of the article to listen to the interview.




18 September 2021 10:25 AM
Tags:
skincare
Dr Nomphelo Gantsho
Cape Skin Doctor

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