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Study: Natural Covid gives 13 times more immunity but adding a jab even more

17 November 2021 10:20 AM
Tags:
COVID-19
Covid immunity
Israeli research

John Maytham speaks to Prof Diana Hardie of the UCT Diagnostic Virology lab about natural immunity efficacy and the vaccine.
  • An Israeli research study reveals that those who survive natural Covid-19 infection receive 13 times more immunity than vaccines
  • But, importantly, the research study also reveals those who survived natural Covid and had had one vaccination developed what is termed hybrid or super immunity and fared the best of all
© drmicrobe/123rf.com

John Maytham says a number of listeners have been sending him coverage of Israeli research which suggests that the immunity one has after surviving Covid-19 is 13 times stronger than the immunity you receive from Covid-19 vaccines.

Read more in the Science.org article: Having SARS-CoV-2 once confers much greater immunity than a vaccine—but vaccination remains vital

But importantly, the research also notes that having a jab as well is even more powerful giving one what is termed hybrid or super immunity.

John Speaks to Professor Diana Hardie at UCT's Diagnostic Virology Laboratory about the study.

I think that both natural infection and vaccinations protect from subsequent severe infection.

Prof Diana Harding, Head - UCT Diagnostic Virology laboratory

In fact, the individuals who did best in that study were naturally infected individuals who had had a dose of vaccine. They had the best protection of the lot.

Prof Diana Harding, Head - UCT Diagnostic Virology laboratory

She says the rationale for vaccination is to protect those individuals who have not yet contracted Covid-19 and thereby protect the healthcare system from becoming overwhelmed with severely ill patients as a result of first exposure.

Neither natural immunity after having the virus nor the vaccines are durable she adds.

Reinfections do occur and are likely to occur at increasing periods of time after the immunising event.

Prof Diana Harding, Head - UCT Diagnostic Virology laboratory

John raises a scenario where people may then argue that because they believe they will survive Covid-19 they would prefer to risk getting the infection - as afterwards would be 13 times more immune to the disease.

Is there any validity to this? Harding says emphatically no.

They are not factoring in the possibility of them experiencing severe outcomes.

Prof Diana Harding, Head - UCT Diagnostic Virology laboratory

The older one is the greater the benefit of vaccination.

Prof Diana Harding, Head - UCT Diagnostic Virology laboratory



17 November 2021 10:20 AM
Tags:
COVID-19
Covid immunity
Israeli research

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