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Race matters when it comes to Covid-19 outcomes in South Africa - study

15 November 2021 4:35 PM
Tags:
Inequality
Race
University of Johannesburg
John Maytham
Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Understanding the differential impacts of Covid-19 among hospitalised patients in South Africa for equitable response
South African Medical
Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya

John Maytham interviews Professor Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya of the University of Johannesburg.
  • Black South Africans are dying at a younger median age after contracting Covid-19 than other race groups

  • The divergent outcomes reflect the unequal living and working conditions in the country


© chanawit/123rf.com

Racial disparities exist in the rate at which people in South Africa are being hospitalised with Covid-19, according to a new paper entitled “Understanding the differential impacts of Covid-19 among hospitalised patients in South Africa for equitable response”.

The paper was recently published in the South African Medical Journal and looked at Covid-19 hospital admissions from 6 March 2020 to 24 January 2021.

John Maytham interviewed lead researcher Professor Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya of the University of Johannesburg (scroll up to listen).

Researchers found that Black African females had the highest hospitalisation rate in the 30 to 39 age group.

Black Africans of all genders were hospitalised at younger ages (median age 52) than other race groups (median age 63).

White South Africans are more likely to die at older ages compared to other race groups.

Black Africans have higher rates of admissions at much lower ages compared to other racial groups… Black Africans are likely to die at younger median ages… compared to their white counterparts…

Professor Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya, University of Johannesburg

It’s actually nothing new. We know the inequalities that exist in our country… the different living and working conditions…

Professor Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya, University of Johannesburg

We remain vulnerable as long as people don’t vaccinate… Vaccines work…

Professor Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya, University of Johannesburg



15 November 2021 4:35 PM
Tags:
Inequality
Race
University of Johannesburg
John Maytham
Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Understanding the differential impacts of Covid-19 among hospitalised patients in South Africa for equitable response
South African Medical
Refilwe Phaswana-Mafuya

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